Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: NASA

  • Doubters, difficulty and distance – Apollo 11’s LRR experiment

    Jason RhianJuly 18th, 2019

    To hear Moon landing conspiracy theorists tell it, the U.S. never sent men to the Moon during the Apollo Program of the 60s and 70s. A recent SpaceFlight Insider interview about a remote facility suggests otherwise.

  • Was Apollo 11 faked? USSR: ‘Nyet’

    Jason RhianJuly 16th, 2019

    Anyone who has ever had a disagreement with anyone else can expect their 'opponent' to paint them as the worst person on the planet and to point out every failure, every falsehood (real or imagined) you've ever had or uttered. In terms of lunar conspiracy theorists this consideration, seems to have eluded them. There were people who would have loved to have proved Apollos 11-17 were faked - a whole nation's worth.

  • SpaceX reveals cause of Crew Dragon explosion

    Jason RhianJuly 15th, 2019

    SpaceX held a test of the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft on April 20, 2019 which ended with an explosion at the NewSpace firm's Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral in Florida. Today, SpaceX released what it believes to have caused the accident during a briefing earlier this afternoon.

  • Proof of Apollo 11 landing hard as ‘rock’

    Joe LatrellJuly 15th, 2019

    JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas -- When asked why they believe the Apollo 11 Moon landings were faked, conspiracy theorists point to the lack of stars in the photos taken by the astronauts, incongruous shadows and other bits of data from that mission. Some evidence that counters their claims isn't so fragile, in fact - it's written in stone.

  • NASA officials at Glenn Symposium address recent leadership overhaul

    Michael ColeJuly 12th, 2019

    CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The reassignment of long-time NASA Associate Administrator for Human Explorations and Operations, Bill Gerstenmaier, came as a shock to most everyone in the space flight community. Such was made clear at the Glenn Symposium which was held July 10-12.

  • Report: Major shakeup at NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    Patrick AttwellJuly 10th, 2019

    NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate has undergone a significant change in leadership. According to a tweet posted by Marcia Smith of Space Policy Online, the changes involved two key personnel either being replaced - or relieved.

  • Voyager team working to keep 42-year-old probes operational

    Laurel KornfeldJuly 9th, 2019

    To keep NASA’s Voyager probes, launched 42 years ago to study the solar system’s gas giant planets, operational in interstellar space for as long as possible, mission scientists are making tough decisions to propel the spacecraft even further.

  • NASA’s IXPE mission marks another win in SpaceX’s contract column

    Patrick AttwellJuly 9th, 2019

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- SpaceX keeps racking up contractual wins. The most recent to be announced was for a NASA mission, one that serves to demonstrate that the company's 74 Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy flights - has not gone unnoticed.

  • SLS Artemis 1 core stage nearing completion

    Scott JohnsonJuly 7th, 2019

    NEW ORLEANS, La. - The core stage (CS-1) for the first flight (Artemis 1 (formerly Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1)) of NASA's next super-heavy lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS), is nearing completion at the agency's Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans.

  • Mars 2020 rover get rock-zapping SuperCam

    Jim SharkeyJuly 4th, 2019

    With its scheduled launch date just over a year away, work on NASA's Mars 2020 rover continues apace. In recent weeks, the rover has received MastCam-Z, its legs and wheels and its main robotic arm. and now one of the "big guns" of its scientific suite has been added to the rover.

  • Orion spacecraft progressing toward Artemis 1 flight

    Michael ColeJuly 4th, 2019

    PLUM BROOK, Ohio -- NASA is making important strides with the Orion spacecraft in preparation for the Artemis 1 mission, the next step in the agency's effort to return humans to the Moon.

  • Gallery: Ascent Abort 2 paves way for Artemis lunar program

    Jason RhianJuly 2nd, 2019

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- During a test that lasted about three-minutes, called Ascent Abort-2, a test article of the Orion spacecraft was launched at 7 a.m. EDT (11:00 GMT) from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex 46 in Florida. A modified Northrop Grumman Peacekeeper missile procured through the U.S. Air Force was used to help demonstrate that the capsule's crew abort system would perform as designed in the event of an emergency encountered on ascent.

  • AA-2 test next step in NASA’s long-lived Orion testing program

    Jason RhianJuly 2nd, 2019

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Should NASA's Orion spacecraft encounter a problem when it is used to send astronauts to the Moon one day, the system tasked with keeping them safe has proven it can do so. The test was dubbed - Ascent Abort 2.

  • NASA’s 2020 Mars rover gets 7-foot-long robot arm

    Jim SharkeyJuly 1st, 2019

    Engineers working in High Bay clean room 1 of the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) recently added a vital component to the space agency's Mars 2020 rover. On June 21, the team installed the rover's main robotic arm.

  • NASA’s Mars 2020 rover gets its legs and wheels

    Jim SharkeyJune 26th, 2019

    In early June, a public webcam was installed in the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and lately there has been a lot of activity to watch.  In recent weeks, engineers have been busy assembling the Mars 2020 rover in preparation for its scheduled launch in July 2020. On June 13, 2019, the team installed one of the rover's most critical pieces of hardware.