Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: NASA

  • NG-11 Cygnus released to begin multi-month post-ISS mission

    Derek RichardsonAugust 6th, 2019

    Northrop Grumman’s NG-11 Cygnus departed the ISS after a 109-day stay aboard the outpost to begin a multi-month free-flying secondary mission.

  • NASA releases report on weather satellite failure

    Laurel KornfeldAugust 2nd, 2019

    A NASA board assigned to investigate the April 2018 failure of an infrared-detecting instrument on board a next-generation weather satellite has released its report. The malfunction has been attributed to a pipe blockage that prevented the flow of needed coolant.

  • Bridenstine selects new director of Goddard Space Flight Center

    Joe LatrellAugust 1st, 2019

    Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been assigned a new acting director by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine as the previous head of the Center has opted to move on.

  • Here’s looking at Euclid: NASA provides crucial parts for ESA dark energy mission

    Jim SharkeyJuly 31st, 2019

    Dark energy and dark matter are two of the biggest mysteries facing modern astronomy. Scheduled to launch in 2022, the European Space Agency's Euclid spacecraft has been designed investigate these invisible phenomena that scientist think make up a majority of our universe. A team of NASA engineers recently delivered crucial components for one on the spacecraft's science instruments.

  • Challenges and triumphs mark TESS’ first year on orbit

    Joe LatrellJuly 30th, 2019

    NASA’S Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) recently celebrated one year of operational status with the discovery of one of the smallest exoplanets found to date. For those working on the project, its discoveries are just a small part of the mission's success.

  • CRS-18 Dragon arrives at ISS with new docking adapter

    Derek RichardsonJuly 27th, 2019

    Days after threading the needle with weather to launch, SpaceX’s CRS-18 Dragon spacecraft rendezvoused and berthed with the International Space Station.

  • Gallery: CRS-18 another check in the ‘Win Box’ for SpaceX

    Derek RichardsonJuly 25th, 2019

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket with the CRS-18 Dragon on the capsule's third flight to the International Space Station on Thursday, July 25. In many ways it marked a repeat performance for the NewSpace company.

  • CRS-18 Falcon and Dragon brave storms to begin 18th ISS flight

    Cullen DesforgesJuly 25th, 2019

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The Expedition 60 crew on board the International Space Station can expect to get some fresh supplies, needed hardware and - slime - in the next few days. This odd payload mix was sent on its way thanks to two venerable pieces of space hardware which were brought to bear by the NewSpace titan - SpaceX.

  • SpaceX’s 18th CRS mission delayed due to bad weather

    Cullen DesforgesJuly 24th, 2019

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- SpaceX’s eighteenth flight to the International Space Station, CRS-18, which was originally scheduled to fly tonight has been delayed due to weather violations caused by Invest 94L as it made its way over the Florida peninsula.

  • Christopher Kraft leaves behind powerful legacy with passing

    Steve HammerJuly 22nd, 2019

    JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas -- Although his name isn't as well-known as Alan Shepard, John Glenn or Neil Armstrong, without the efforts of Christopher C. Kraft, NASA would likely never have left orbit let alone sent men to the Moon. Kraft passed away on Monday, July 22 at the age of 95.

  • VP Pence reinforces lunar convictions at Apollo 11 celebration

    Cullen DesforgesJuly 21st, 2019

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Vice President Mike Pence paid a visit to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Friday, July 19 at the center’s Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. His appearance came at a time when the agency both remembered past achievements and worked toward restoring along-lost capability.

  • From Lunar to LEO, MS-13 trio blasts off toward ISS

    Jason RhianJuly 20th, 2019

    Fifty years is a long time. In the past half-century NASA has gone from launching men to the Moon to being dependent on the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, for access to low-Earth orbit. The latest flight under the agreement took place 50 years to the day NASA achieved what was once believed to be impossible.

  • Mars 2020 rover makes ‘pit stop’ at JPL

    Jim SharkeyJuly 19th, 2019

    The launch window for NASA's Mars 2020 rover opens in just under a year, and engineers at the agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have been hard at work assembling the vehicle in the clean room of JPL's Spacecraft Assembly Facility. As one might imagine getting a vehicle prepped for such a massive undertaking - is a group effort.

  • Inside the SIRIUS-19 lunar mission simulation: preparing for the next leap

    Paul KnightlyJuly 19th, 2019

    As the world prepares to mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing, a 4-month long international lunar mission simulation is preparing to conclude in Russia. SIRIUS, which stands for Scientific International Research in Unique Terrestrial Station, aims to study human psychology and performance under a simulated lunar mission scenario in order to […]

  • Doubters, difficulty and distance – Apollo 11’s LRR experiment

    Jason RhianJuly 18th, 2019

    To hear Moon landing conspiracy theorists tell it, the U.S. never sent men to the Moon during the Apollo Program of the 60s and 70s. A recent SpaceFlight Insider interview about a remote facility suggests otherwise.