Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: Long March 4C

  • Contact lost with China’s DSLWP-A1 lunar microsatellite

    Tomasz NowakowskiJune 1st, 2018

    China has apparently lost contact with one of its two lunar radio astronomy microsatellites sent into space last week together with a communications relay spacecraft for Chang’e 4 lunar mission.

  • Long March 4C sends Chang’e 4 relay satellite toward Moon

    Tomasz NowakowskiMay 21st, 2018

    Using a Long March 4C rocket, China launched the first spacecraft of its Chang’e 4 lunar mission along with two smaller satellites. The booster lifted off at 5:28 p.m. EDT (21:28 GMT) May 20, 2018, from Launch Complex 3 at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in the country's Sichuan Province.

  • First spacecraft for China’s Chang’e 4 lunar mission launching Sunday

    Tomasz NowakowskiMay 19th, 2018

    China's Queqiao communications relay satellite is undergoing final preparations before launch. It is the first spacecraft of the country's ambitious Chang'e 4 mission, which will culminate in the first spacecraft to soft-land on the far side of the moon in late 2018.

  • Long March 4C orbits Gaofen 5 high-resolution Earth-observing satellite

    Tomasz NowakowskiMay 9th, 2018

    One of China’s Long March 4C boosters took to the skies on Tuesday, May 8 to orbit Gaofen 5 - the country’s newest high-resolution Earth-observation satellite.

  • China conducts surprise launch of Long March 4C rocket, lofts four satellites into space

    Tomasz NowakowskiApril 11th, 2018

    Without any prior notice, China sent a Long March 4C booster aloft on Tuesday, April 10, carrying three Yaogan-31 spacecraft along with one microsatellite.

  • Long March 4C orbits trio of Gaofen-1 Earth-observing satellites

    Tomasz NowakowskiApril 2nd, 2018

    A Long March 4C rocket took to the skies in an unannounced launch to deliver a triplet of Gaofen-1 Earth-observing satellites for China. Liftoff occurred at 11:22 p.m. EDT March 30 (3:22 GMT March 31), 2018, from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in the country's Shanxi Province.

  • Long March 4C sends Fengyun-3D and Head-1 into orbit

    Tomasz NowakowskiNovember 14th, 2017

    Lifting off from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC) located in China’s Shanxi Province, a Long March 4C rocket has delivered the Fengyun-3D and Head-1 satellites into their orbits. The launch was conducted from TSLC's LC9 Launch Complex at 18:35 GMT (1:35 p.m. EST) on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017.

  • China’s Long March 4C booster suffers suspected launch failure

    Tomasz NowakowskiSeptember 1st, 2016

    China was expected to launch its Gaofen-10 Earth-observing satellite atop a Long March 4C rocket Wednesday, Aug. 31, but it seems the mission ended in failure. The booster was due to be launched between 2:46 and 3:11 p.m. EDT (18:46 and 19:11 GMT) from the LC9 Launch Complex at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in China’s Shanxi Province.

  • China successfully launches its Gaofen-3 Earth-observing satellite

    Tomasz NowakowskiAugust 10th, 2016

    China continues its busy 2016 launch schedule with the latest liftoff of the country’s high-resolution Earth-imaging satellite, known as Gaofen-3. The spacecraft was sent aloft atop a Long March 4C rocket at 6:55 p.m. EDT (22:55 GMT) Tuesday, Aug. 9, from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in Shanxi Province.

  • Chinese Long March 4C rocket conducts surprise Yaogan-29 launch

    Tomasz NowakowskiNovember 28th, 2015

    On Thursday, November 26, 2015, China conducted another surprise launch this year, lifting the Yaogan-29 satellite into space. The spacecraft was launched atop a Long March 4C booster at 4:24 p.m. EST (21:24 GMT) from the LC9 launch complex at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC), located in Shanxi Province, north China.

  • China launches Long March 4C rocket with Yaogan 27 spy satellite

    Tomasz NowakowskiAugust 31st, 2015

    China launched its latest spy satellite into orbit on Thursday, Aug. 27 at 10:31 p.m. EDT (02:31 GMT) atop a Long March 4C rocket. The flight took place from the country’s LC9 launch complex at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in northeastern China’s Shanxi province.