Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: Editorial

  • Notes on the Run: Where the wild things are

    Jason RhianJanuary 13th, 2019

    The locations where rockets are tested at or lift off from are usually in the middle of nowhere. Within these swamps and deserts live a wide assortment of creatures that you have to contend with if you're going to be in the space business.

  • OPINION: 50 years after Apollo 8 NASA is grounded

    Jason RhianDecember 25th, 2018

    On Dec. 25, 1968 astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders circled the Moon in their Apollo 8 capsule. This was a dark period in U.S. history and, as one person stated via a telegraph, Apollo 8 had "saved 1968." It was a time when anything seemed possible. It now serves as a reminder of a bygone age.

  • Inside Opportunity: Oppy still silent

    James RiceNovember 1st, 2018

    Dr. Jim Rice has provided this latest update from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Has the rover been silenced forever?

  • Opinion: Musk marijuana story much ado about nothing

    Jason RhianSeptember 9th, 2018

    Elon Musk smoked pot and drank whiskey in California. The story was painted as if the event was some bizarre Matthew McConaughey moment where Musk was banging on a bongo drum and smoking weed. After watching the 2.5-hour Joe Rogan interview, one is left with the impression that some in the media must be in desperate need of views.

  • He who laughs last – launches best: Parker Solar Probe mission a testament to faith

    Jason RhianAugust 13th, 2018

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A speech during a pivotal scene in the 2016 movie Captain America Civil War, has become relevant in terms of the recent flight of the Parker Solar Probe. If you don't think so, you might want to chat with Eugene Parker. 

  • Space exploration and scientific discovery: Space strategy needed by 2020

    Press ReleaseJuly 16th, 2018

    Space exploration and scientific discovery initiatives are increasingly becoming global endeavors. The costs involved can be beyond the resources any single country, so for the world to explore space and make more scientific discoveries there should be a space strategy by 2020.

  • Opinion: Mutants, airstrikes and more: Space ‘fake news’ on the rise

    Jason RhianApril 1st, 2018

    Fake news, a relatively new term that has entered the public lexicon. Stories regarding space flight have recently seen an uptick in incorrect information being reported and given the complexity of the subject matter, it might be understandable—but it is also preventable.

  • OPINION: How NASA became a ping-pong ball

    Jason RhianDecember 17th, 2017

    For 30 years, NASA's human space flight program was in a secure, albeit uninspiring, trajectory – low-Earth orbit. The loss of the Shuttle Columbia and her seven-member crew on Feb. 1, 2003, changed all that. The Shuttle era was set to end and the agency would discover there's something even more dangerous than re-entering Earth's atmosphere with damaged heat tiles – politicians.

  • OPINION: Is there inconsistency in how NASA treats its private partners?

    Jason RhianJuly 23rd, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A recent report noted that NASA will not be releasing a public report on the findings of the SpaceX Falcon 9 CRS-7 explosion. The report also denotes that a previous similar accident was handled differently by NASA, but were the two accidents so distinct as to warrant two totally dissimilar approaches?

  • OPINION: President-elect Trump’s NASA landing team continues to take shape

    Curt GodwinDecember 26th, 2016

    Though both candidates made clear their position on a multitude of issues prior to the election, their view of NASA's role in our nation's spacefaring efforts wasn't really among them. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump often gave politically expedient answers when asked what their vision for NASA, but neither has ever really presented a coherent roadmap for its future.

  • OPINION: Commercial Crew – It was never about saving money

    Curt GodwinNovember 1st, 2016

    The last time NASA had to pony up for astronauts to hitch a ride to the International Space Station (ISS) with the Russians on their venerable Soyuz spacecraft, they paid – on average – nearly $82 million per seat, for a total of six seats. That's $490 million to get six astronauts to the ISS.

  • Reflections on the launch of OA-5: Waiting

    Jason RhianOctober 25th, 2016

    CHINCOTEAGUE, Va. — The sleepy seaside village of Chincoteague only has a population of about 3,000 and is generally a quiet restful place best known for the wild ponies who reside in the wetlands surrounding NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility. The island’s peaceful nature has been interrupted over the course of the past three years with some fairly dramatic activity.

  • Reflections on the launch of OA-5: Infinite Blue

    Jason RhianOctober 24th, 2016

    WALLOPS ISLAND, Va. — On Monday, Oct. 10, as I sit at Orlando International Airport, I was left wondering which gods I had offended. This was one of only a handful of trips SpaceFlight Insider had opted to undertake in 2016, and it was off to a less than auspicious start.

  • OPINION: What are the 2016 presidential contenders’ views on space?

    Jim SiegelSeptember 25th, 2016

    Voters are likely having a hard time learning about how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump feel about space exploration. Neither of their websites mentions NASA or space exploration. The platforms for each Party only give a cursory mention of these topics. Space exploration simply doesn't top the agenda during this election.