Spaceflight Insider

Stacking underway for next Atlas V launch

The Atlas V to be used for the AEHF-5 mission is being assembled at the Vertical Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 41. Photo Credit: Michael Howard / SpaceFlight Insider

The Atlas V to be used for the AEHF-5 mission is being assembled at the Vertical Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 41. Photo Credit: Michael Howard / SpaceFlight Insider

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — United Launch Alliance has begun assembling the Atlas V rocket that will be used to orbit the U.S. Air Force’s next advanced communications satellite.

Having arrived in Florida on May 17, 2019, the first stage of the 204-foot (62.2-meter) tall Atlas V 551 rocket has since been installed on a mobile platform in the Vertical Integration Facility a short distance from the pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 41.

There, five strap-on Aerojet solid rocket motors will be added as well as a Centaur upper stage and a 5-meter payload fairing.

Inside the payload fairing will be the fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-5) military communications satellite, built by Lockheed Martin. The previous AEHF satellites launched in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2018, all atop an Atlas V 551 rocket.

Liftoff for the AEHF-5 mission is slated for sometime in a two-hour launch window that opens at 6 a.m. EDT (10:00 GMT) June 27, 2019.

This will be the 80th flight of an Atlas V since its debut in 2002 and the 10th in the 551 configuration, which has five solid rocket motors, a 5-meter fairing and a single engine Centaur upper stage.

For ULA, this will be the company’s third rocket launch of 2019. The previous two were Delta 4 rockets launching the NROL-71 and WGS-10 spacecraft.

After the AEHF-5 mission gets off the ground, ULA is set to begin stacking the Atlas V that will be used for the company’s next mission, orbiting Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner for its unpiloted Orbital Flight Test to the International Space Station. That mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than August.

Cranes rotate the Atlas V first stage from horizontal to vertical to attach it to the mobile launch platform at the Vertical Integration Facility. Photo Credit: United Launch Alliance

Cranes rotate the Atlas V first stage from horizontal to vertical to attach it to the mobile launch platform at the Vertical Integration Facility. Photo Credit: United Launch Alliance

 

Tagged:

Derek Richardson has a degree in mass media, with an emphasis in contemporary journalism, from Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas. While at Washburn, he was the managing editor of the student run newspaper, the Washburn Review. He also has a blog about the International Space Station, called Orbital Velocity. He met with members of the SpaceFlight Insider team during the flight of a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 551 rocket with the MUOS-4 satellite. Richardson joined our team shortly thereafter. His passion for space ignited when he watched Space Shuttle Discovery launch into space Oct. 29, 1998. Today, this fervor has accelerated toward orbit and shows no signs of slowing down. After dabbling in math and engineering courses in college, he soon realized his true calling was communicating to others about space. Since joining SpaceFlight Insider in 2015, Richardson has worked to increase the quality of our content, eventually becoming our managing editor. @TheSpaceWriter

Reader Comments

⚠ Commenting Rules

Post Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *