Spaceflight Insider

Starlink launch scrubbed again

The Falcon 9, with 60 SpaceX Starlink satellites encapsulated on top, stands vertical at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida. Photo Credit: Michael Howard / SpaceFlight Insider

The Falcon 9, with 60 SpaceX Starlink satellites encapsulated on top, stands vertical at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida. Photo Credit: Michael Howard / SpaceFlight Insider

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — For the second day in a row, SpaceX has called off the launch of its Falcon 9 rocket with the first 60 Starlink satellites.

On the first attempt, on May 15, high upper level winds prompted SpaceX to call of the launch of its Falcon 9 rocket carrying its first 60 Starlink satellites. Then, around three hours before the May 16 attempt, the company called off the launch again. It was supposed to take to the skies at 10:30 p.m. EDT (02:30 GMT May 17) from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida.

“Standing down to update satellite software and triple-check everything again,” SpaceX updated in a tweet. “Always want to do everything we can on the ground to maximize mission success.”

The official forecast for the May 16 attempt was expected to have a 90% chance of favorable conditions. SpaceX said its next launch opportunity will be in about a week.

As many as 12,000 Starlink satellites are expected to be launched over the next decade. However, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said seven launches worth of spacecraft are required for an initial activation and 12 for significant coverage.

 

 

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Derek Richardson has a degree in mass media, with an emphasis in contemporary journalism, from Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas. While at Washburn, he was the managing editor of the student run newspaper, the Washburn Review. He also has a blog about the International Space Station, called Orbital Velocity. He met with members of the SpaceFlight Insider team during the flight of a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 551 rocket with the MUOS-4 satellite. Richardson joined our team shortly thereafter. His passion for space ignited when he watched Space Shuttle Discovery launch into space Oct. 29, 1998. Today, this fervor has accelerated toward orbit and shows no signs of slowing down. After dabbling in math and engineering courses in college, he soon realized his true calling was communicating to others about space. Since joining SpaceFlight Insider in 2015, Richardson has worked to increase the quality of our content, eventually becoming our managing editor. @TheSpaceWriter

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