Spaceflight Insider

Launch of SpaceX Falcon 9 with CRS-13 Dragon slips 24 hours

The CRS-13 Falcon 9 rocket at Cape Canaveral's Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida. Photo Credit: Ryan Chylinski / SpaceFlight Insider

The CRS-13 Falcon 9 rocket at Cape Canaveral’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida. Photo Credit: Ryan Chylinski / SpaceFlight Insider

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket has slipped an additional 24 hours to “allow for additional time for pre-launch ground checks.” This information is per a post made on Twitter by SpaceX at 6:50 p.m. EST (10:50 GMT) on Monday, Dec. 11. 

With this postponement, the flight of CRS-13 has had no fewer than six launch dates, with the flight being pushed back from Sept. 13, Nov. 1, Dec. 4, Dec. 8 and Dec. 12. 

The launch of the CRS-13 mission will be the first from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 since the Sept. 1, 2016 explosion of another Falcon 9 rocket that resulted in the loss of the $185 million Spacecom Amos 6 satellite, the Falcon 9 rocket itself and much of the infrastructure at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40.

Since that time, SpaceX has maintained an impressive launch tempo by utilizing Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A, which it uses under a 20-year lease with NASA as well as its West Coast launch site, Space Launch Complex 4E (East) located at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

 

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Jason Rhian spent several years honing his skills with internships at NASA, the National Space Society and other organizations. He has provided content for outlets such as: Aviation Week & Space Technology, Space.com, The Mars Society and Universe Today.

Reader Comments

The third paragraph is missing some information – or is confusing. It is the first launch at “Complex 40” since the explosion. As it reads now, it sounds like SpaceX hasn’t had any other launches at all. I knew what you meant though. Thanks for the update.

Dec. 12, 2017

Hi Dale,
We’ve corrected it, thanks for your thoughts!
Sincerely, Jason Rhian – Editor, SpaceFlight Insider

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