Spaceflight Insider

Orbital’s Antares booster moved to Wallops’ Pad-0a in prepartion for Orb-3 launch

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Orbital Sciences Corporation and NASA rolled the Antares booster and Cygnus spacecraft which will carry out the Orb-3 mission to the International Space Station (ISS) out of Wallops’ Horizontal Integration Facility (HIF) at 4:45 p.m. EDT (2045 GMT). The duo were ferried out to NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport’s Pad-0A in preparation for a launch that is planned to take place at 6:45 p.m. EDT (2045 GMT) on Monday, Oct. 27.

The one mile journey between the HIF and Pad-0A marked the start of the third of eight contracted missions to the space station that Orbital is committed to carrying out under the Commercial Resupply Services (CRS ) contract (and the fourth flight overall for Cygnus to the ISS). Cygnus  is carrying an estimated 5,000 lbs of cargo and crew supplies.

Stay tuned to SpaceFlight Insider for live updates from “Team Wallops” who will be covering the launch attempt

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

Photo Credit: Joel Kowsky / NASA

 

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Jason Rhian spent several years honing his skills with internships at NASA, the National Space Society and other organizations. He has provided content for outlets such as: Aviation Week & Space Technology, Space.com, The Mars Society and Universe Today.

Reader Comments

Orbital never launches on time, this launch has been delayed over a dozen times already.

I suspect that the reason it’s been delayed so often, is because launching rockets successfully is still really really challenging. They would also prefer to take a delay, rather than have a rocket go BOOM over the Atlantic.

I have a good friend who works on this program up at Wallops, He tells me they are way under staffed and have to work 50, 60 and sometimes up to 80 hours a week. The workers are walking around like zombies most of the time because they are physically and very much mentally drained from lack of sleep and time off.
I always thought NASA had rules about working excessive hours, maybe those rules were for their program because Orbital and space x both violate the work rule policy.

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