Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Author: Ocean McIntyre

A native of the Greater Los Angeles area, Ocean McIntyre's writing is focused primarily on science (STEM and STEAM) education and public outreach. McIntyre is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador as well as holding memberships with The Planetary Society, Los Angeles Astronomical Society, and is a founding member of SafePlaceForSpace.org. McIntyre is currently studying astrophysics and planetary science with additional interests in astrobiology, cosmology and directed energy propulsion technology. With SpaceFlight Insider seeking to expand the amount of science articles it produces, McIntyre was a welcomed addition to our growing team.

Articles By Ocean McIntyre

  • ‘Warm Neptune’ HAT-P-26b has primitive atmosphere

    May 16th, 2017

    Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, announced in a paper published on May 12, 2017, an exoplanet designated HAT-P-26b, which was confirmed in 2010, has a primitive atmosphere of hydrogen and helium.

  • The Big Empty: Cassini finds virtually no particles between Saturn and its rings

    May 14th, 2017

    Based on data collected on the first of the Cassini spacecraft's planned 22 "Grand Finale" orbits, the area between the cloud tops of Saturn and the inner-most ring seems to be mostly dust-free. Instead of the heavy distribution of dust particles Cassini had detected when it made its ring grazing orbits in late 2016, the spacecraft instead revealed a “big empty."

  • ‘Iceball’ planet discovered through microlensing

    May 2nd, 2017

    Scientists have discovered the lowest-massed exoplanet ever detected using gravitational microlensing. The exoplanet, OGLE-2016-BLG-1195Lb, is located in the constellation Scorpius some 13,000 light-years from Earth.

  • NASA scientists contemplate using LISA Pathfinder as ‘comet crumb’ detector

    April 22nd, 2017

    Launched on Dec. 3, 2015, from the European Spaceport in French Guiana, the European Space Agency’s Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder mission is turning out to reveal far more than the elusive gravitational waves it was designed to detect.