Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: The Range

  • NASA gives Dawn mission second extension

    Laurel KornfeldOctober 22nd, 2017

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft, which has been orbiting Ceres since March 2015, has just been given a second extension, which will be used to bring the probe into the closest orbit yet around the dwarf planet.

  • Gallery: Cygnus OA-8 named after late Moonwalker

    Derek RichardsonOctober 21st, 2017

    WALLOPS ISLAND, Va. — The next Cygnus spacecraft bound for the International Space Station has a name: The S.S. Gene Cernan. Liftoff of the soda can-shaped spacecraft is currently scheduled for 7:37 a.m. EDT (11:37 GMT) on Nov. 11, 2017.

  • Mars hydrothermal deposits hint at habitable conditions

    Ocean McIntyreOctober 21st, 2017

    A recent report in Nature Communications indicates that ancient Mars may have had deep sea-floor hydrothermal activity. Hydrothermal deposits on Earth are associated with the earliest signs of life and habitable environments today. Their detection on Mars has implications for the possibility of ancient life on the Red Planet.

  • Reconstructing Cassini’s final moments

    Jim SharkeyOctober 21st, 2017

    During the Cassini spacecraft's final plunge into Saturn's upper atmosphere on Sept.15, 2017, the spacecraft live-streamed data from eight of its science instruments, providing readings from a variety of engineering systems. While it will take time to analyze all of the data from its plunge, engineers with the Cassini team already have a pretty clear understanding of how the spacecraft behaved as it went in.

  • Musk provides more insight on SpaceX’s Mars ambitions

    Curt GodwinOctober 20th, 2017

    Less than a month after Elon Musk revealed SpaceX's updated Mars mission architecture at the 2017 International Astronautical Congress, the billionaire CEO made himself available to the public to answer further questions about the company's ambitious undertaking. In a surprise tweet on Oct. 14, 2017, the SpaceX founder gave short notice to taking part in an "Ask Me Anything" (AMA) on the popular website, Reddit.

  • Facebook Live chat kicks off ‘Year of Education’ at ISS

    Benjamin O'BrienOctober 20th, 2017

    NASA’s Year of Education on Station kicked off on October 16, 2017, via Facebook Live, when NASA Public Affairs Officers Brandi Dean and Kirk Shireman contacted NASA astronaut Joe Acaba and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Paolo Nespoli up at the ISS to talk with students and teachers across the nation about their lives on the station and the work they do.

  • Ring discovered orbiting dwarf planet Haumea

    Laurel KornfeldOctober 19th, 2017

    Scientists were surprised to find a narrow ring circling the dwarf planet Haumea when they observed the small world pass in front of a background star in January 2017.

  • Parker Solar Probe approved for environmental testing

    Christopher PaulOctober 18th, 2017

    The Parker Solar Probe, formerly called Solar Probe Plus, has been certified ready for environmental testing. This means that engineers have inspected the spacecraft and have decided it is ready to be subjected to simulations of the conditions it will face during its launch and operations in space.

  • Crash Scene Investigation: Resting place of ESA’s first lunar mission found

    Tomasz NowakowskiOctober 17th, 2017

    By analyzing high-resolution images from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), researchers have identified the final resting place of the European Space Agency’s (ESA) first lunar mission, known as SMART-1. The spacecraft was deliberately crashed into the Moon 11 years ago.

  • Satellite data shows largest CO2 increase comes from Earth’s tropics

    Laurel KornfeldOctober 16th, 2017

    Data collected by NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite, launched in 2014 to measure changing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) worldwide, indicate Earth's tropics have been the largest sources of recent CO2 emissions.

  • GAO: Even with production resumed, NASA plutonium supply at risk

    Bart LeahyOctober 15th, 2017

    Some of NASA’s most accomplished deep-space missions—including Voyager, Cassini, and Mars Science Laboratory—have relied on radioactive plutonium-238 for onboard power and heat. However, a recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) report states that despite efforts to restart domestic plutonium production, NASA is in danger of not having enough of the radioactive material for future missions by the mid-2020s.

  • ESA details construction of Sentinel-5P satellite and Tropomi instrument

    Jacques van OeneOctober 15th, 2017

    NOORDWIJK, Netherlands — The Sentinel-5P satellite was launched atop a Russian Rockot rocket at 12:37 p.m. local time (5:37 a.m. EDT / 09:27 GMT) Oct. 13, 2017, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in northern Russia. During a webcast before liftoff, a number of the key players in the development of the mission discussed building the satellite and its state-of-the-art Tropomi instrument from the European Space Agency's technical heart in the Netherlands.

  • U.S. Air Force declares first GPS III satellite ‘Available for Launch’

    Jim SharkeyOctober 14th, 2017

    On Tuesday, October 10, 2017, the U.S. Air Force declared that the first Lockheed Martin-built GPS III satellite will be "Available for Launch" in 2018.

  • Rocket Crafters adds advisory board member

    Press ReleaseOctober 14th, 2017

    TITUSVILLE, FL. – (October 10, 2017) – Rocket Crafters, Inc., (RCI) announced today that Dale Coxwell, CEO of Coastal Steel Manufacturing, LLC, of Cocoa, Florida, is joining its Board of Advisors. Coxwell is also the executive vice president and owner of Coastal Steel, Inc.

  • NASA awards contract to launch miniature payloads

    Jason RhianOctober 13th, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- NASA has tapped Spaceflight Inc. for integration and launch services for so-called "U-Class payloads." These tiny space research satellites. This contract, one with a firm-fixed-price, is for base launch services in 2018 for 24 payloads.