Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: The Range

  • Long March 2D to send a duo of SuperView-1 satellites into orbit

    Tomasz NowakowskiJanuary 7th, 2018

    China is gearing up to conduct its first orbital flight of 2018. The mission, scheduled for Tuesday, January 9, will employ a Long March 2D booster to send two SuperView-1 Earth-observing satellites into space.

  • New Horizons mission invites public to celebrate New Year’s KBO flyby

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 5th, 2018

    The world may have celebrated New Year's 2018 just days ago, but NASA's New Horizons mission is already inviting the public to welcome 2019 with a visit to Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69.

  • Launch of Zuma now TBD or is it Jan. 6? – UPDATE

    Jason RhianJanuary 4th, 2018

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- SpaceX's planned launch of the classified "Zuma" mission has slipped from 2017 to Thursday Jan. 4, to Friday Jan. 5 and now is listed as "To Be Determined." The announcement of the latest delay was made by the 45th Space Wing on their website. Some sources, meanwhile, are stating the secretive launch will take place on Saturday, Jan. 6. So which is it?

  • 2 external instruments installed on ISS over New Year’s holiday

    Derek RichardsonJanuary 3rd, 2018

    While many around the world celebrated the arrival of 2018 with champagne, fireworks and social gatherings, robotics operators at NASA’s Johnson Space Center rang in the New Year by working to remotely install new external instruments recently brought to International Space Station inside the trunk of SpaceX’s CRS-13 Dragon cargo spacecraft.

  • NASA’s MAVEN mission providing insights into life on distant worlds

    Jason RhianDecember 31st, 2017

    Mars. Long a destination dreamed of by the public in general and space enthusiasts in particular, is providing insights about the length of time that other planets can support life. How long would a planet like Mars, orbiting a distant red dwarf star be habitable? One of NASA's Scout Program missions is helping to develop an answer.

  • Astronomy satellite deployed by JPL

    Jason RhianDecember 30th, 2017

    With research dollars and room on launch vehicles at a premium, the miniaturization of payloads has become an ever-more used means in which researchers and those seeking to prove out their technologies can fly in space. The ASTERIA CubeSat that was recently deployed from the International Space Station could serve to further validate the emerging technology for astronomy purposes.

  • Russia restores contact with AngoSat-1 satellite

    Tomasz NowakowskiDecember 29th, 2017

    Russia has stated that it has restored contact with Angola’s first satellite, AngoSat-1, that was launched by a Zenit rocket on Tuesday, December 26, 2017. 

  • Gallium nitride processor: Next-generation technology for space exploration

    Tomasz NowakowskiDecember 28th, 2017

    A material known as gallium nitride (GaN), poised to become the next semiconductor for power electronics, could also be essential for various space applications. Yuji Zhao, an expert in electrical and computer engineering at Arizona State University (ASU), plans to develop the first ever processor from gallium nitride, which could revolutionize future space exploration missions.

  • Planetary Resources’ Arkyd-6 ready for launch

    Collin SkocikDecember 27th, 2017

    After years of development, the Planetary Resources-built Arkyd-6 is finally on the last leg of its journey into space. It is scheduled to be launched as a secondary payload atop India’s PSLV-C40 mission in January 2018.

  • Will space tourism ever happen?

    Sponsored ContentDecember 26th, 2017

    Elon Musk, the CEO of SpaceX recently announced that two unnamed people will be flying in a loop around the Moon on a ‘holiday trip’ that they have paid significant amounts of money for. Space tourism is an exciting and innovative area, but a lot of debate surrounds it. Apart from the obvious technical difficulties that crewed flights to space presents, there are also questions surrounding affordability, morality and potential environmental concerns that may set back the potential new industry of space tourism.

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: The atheist and Apollo 8

    Jason RhianDecember 25th, 2017

    When most people think of Apollo 8, they think of how the Book of Genesis was read from the vicinity of the Moon and the well-wishes the trio of astronauts gave the world. The year 1968 was not a good one in terms of U.S. history, and Apollo 8 ended that dark year on a high note – for most Americans. One exception, an atheist who opted to sue the U.S. government over violations of the first amendment by reading from Genesis on a government-sponsored mission. Who was this person and what happened to them?

  • New Horizons put in final hibernation before 2019 KBO flyby

    Laurel KornfeldDecember 24th, 2017

    A little over a year before its New Year's day 2019 flyby of Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft was put into its final hibernation prior to the visit.

  • Fueling operations for SBIRS GEO-4 mission begin

    Jason RhianDecember 21st, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The flight of the fourth Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) satellite is getting closer to its targeted January 2018 launch date.

  • Lockheed Martin completes main assembly of Hellas-Sat-4/SaudiGeoSat-1

    Christopher PaulDecember 20th, 2017

    Lockheed Martin has completed the primary assembly of the Hellas-Sat-4/SaudiGeoSat-1 communications satellite, based on the modernized LM 2100 series spacecraft, and has shipped the satellite to its environmental testing facility in Sunnyvale, California.

  • Rocket Lab delays 2nd Electron test flight until 2018

    Rae Botsford EndDecember 20th, 2017

    After four scrubs, the second test flight of Rocket Lab's Electron rocket has been postponed until early 2018. In the initial release about the launch window, Rocket Lab CEO and CTO Peter Beck said the company was expecting to scrub multiple times as it waits for the perfect conditions and ensures everything on the vehicle performs as designed. That patience was and continues to be needed.