Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: The Range

  • Atmospheric haze makes Pluto colder than previously thought

    Laurel KornfeldNovember 18th, 2017

    When NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft flew by Pluto in July 2015, its instruments found the dwarf planet’s atmospheric temperature to be significantly colder than scientists had expected.

  • SpaceX, ULA reschedule next launches

    Derek RichardsonNovember 16th, 2017

    Both SpaceX and United Launch Alliance (ULA) have rescheduled their next launches from the East and West Coasts, respectively. SpaceX, which will be sending the mystery “Zuma” payload into space atop a Falcon 9 rocket, opted to postpone by at least a day to examine data from a recent payload fairing test. ULA, on the other hand, is hoping to fly its Delta II after two scrubbed attempts.

  • NASA performs first test of Mars 2020 rover supersonic parachute

    Jim SharkeyNovember 16th, 2017

    On October 4, 2017, NASA completed the first supersonic parachute test in preparation for the space agency's Mars 2020 rover mission. A 58-foot (17.7-meter) Black Brandt IX sounding rocket launched the Advanced Supersonic Parachute Inflation Research Experiment (ASPIRE) payload from NASA's Wallops Island Flight Facility in Virginia.

  • Harry Kolcum Awards presented at NSCFLC November 2017

    Michael McCabeNovember 16th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — On November 14, 2017, the National Space Club Florida Committee (NSCFLC) November 2017 luncheon kicked off with the Pledge of Allegiance and the introduction of their 2017–2018 Chairperson Patty Stratton who was introduced by Dale Ketchum. The day’s event focused on the 2017 Harry Kolcum News & Communications Award.

  • Launch of JPSS-1 scrubbed again, high upper-level winds to blame

    Jason RhianNovember 15th, 2017

    The flight of a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta II rocket with its payload of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Joint Polar Satellite System 1 (JPSS-1) spacecraft has been delayed for a second time. However, whereas yesterday's (Nov. 14) scrub was caused by wayward boaters, issues with the atmosphere were to blame for today's delay.

  • Ancient interior activity likely formed features on Ceres’ surface

    Laurel KornfeldNovember 15th, 2017

    A new analysis of surface features on Ceres sent back by NASA's Dawn spacecraft indicates that at least some of those features were created by the ancient movement of materials in the dwarf planet's interior.

  • Launch of NOAA’s JPSS-1 slips 24 hours

    Ocean McIntyreNovember 14th, 2017

    The launch of the first of NOAA’s planned four Joint Polar Satellite System satellites, JPSS-1, was scrubbed early in the morning of Nov. 14, 2017, due to a combination of wayward boats that had crossed into restricted space as well as a couple of positions that reported technical “no-goes” during the countdown and system checks.

  • Review: Weir focuses on the Moon with ‘Artemis’

    Jason RhianNovember 14th, 2017

    Over the course of the past year, public and private officials have altered their focus from Mars to a much closer target – Earth's Moon. Now, Andy Weir whose breakout success was based on the adventures of a castaway on the Red Planet has followed suit with his latest offering – Artemis.

  • Swarm of nanosatellites could visit over 300 asteroids

    Tomasz NowakowskiNovember 12th, 2017

    European scientists have proposed a mission consisting of 50 tiny spacecraft, which could visit and study over 300 asteroids in a timespan of just over three years. The concept, named Asteroid Touring Nanosat Fleet, was presented at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) 2017 that took place in September in Riga, Latvia.

  • Orbital ATK successfully tests first motor case for Next Generation Launch Vehicle

    Ocean McIntyreNovember 10th, 2017

    Orbital ATK of Dulles, Virginia, successfully reached another milestone last week in its development of an advanced solid rocket engine program to be used in intermediate- and large-class launch vehicles.

  • Chandrayaan-2 Moon mission to be launched in first quarter of 2018

    Tomasz NowakowskiNovember 10th, 2017

    A. S. Kiran Kumar, the chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), has recently revealed that Chandrayaan-2 – India’s second mission to the Moon – will be ready for launch sometime in the first quarter of 2018, noting that the spacecraft is currently in its final stages of integration.

  • X3 Hall thruster sets records at NASA Glenn

    Michael ColeNovember 10th, 2017

    GLENN RESEARCH CENTER,  Ohio — Researchers at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor, and the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, have completed a round of important tests on a new ion thruster system that may one day provide propulsion for materials and crews on future missions to Mars.

  • NASA Exploration Mission-1 managing current challenges, but launch could slip to 2020

    Bart LeahyNovember 9th, 2017

    On November 8, 2017, NASA released an update following a schedule review of Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), the first uncrewed flight test of the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft to the Moon.

  • Public invited to vote on nicknames for New Horizons’ next target

    Laurel KornfeldNovember 8th, 2017

    With just a little over a year remaining until New Horizons' flyby of 2014 MU69, NASA is asking the public for help in choosing a nickname for the Kuiper Belt Object (KBO).

  • Cassini data proposes new explanation for Enceladus’ active ocean

    Laurel KornfeldNovember 7th, 2017

    A new study that incorporates various findings by NASA's Cassini mission regarding Saturn's moon Enceladus proposes that the moon has a porous core in which rocks flex and rub together, producing sufficient heat via friction to power its global subsurface ocean.