Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: The Range

  • Aerojet Rocketdyne consolidating, optimizing operations

    Scott JohnsonApril 23rd, 2017

    Aerojet Rocketdyne recently announced the next phase of what it calls its Competitive Improvement Program (CIP), a plan to consolidate and optimize the company's operation. It is hoped this will result in an annual savings of $230 million.

  • Opportunity Mars rover leaves ‘Tribulation’ for ‘Perseverance’

    Jim SharkeyApril 23rd, 2017

    NASA's Opportunity Mars rover is leaving "Cape Tribulation" – the crater-rim segment it has investigated since late 2014 – and driving south toward its next destination, "Perseverance Valley". The rover team plans to explore the valley to determine what type of activity carved it billions of years ago: water, wind, or flowing debris carried by water.

  • Russia claims U.S. will continue to purchase RD-180 engines

    Lloyd CampbellApril 22nd, 2017

    On Friday, April 14, 2017, Yuri Vlasov, CEO of the United Rocket and Space Corporation, stated that the RD-180 engines, which currently power the Atlas V booster, would be delivered to the United States until 2024–2025.

  • NASA scientists contemplate using LISA Pathfinder as ‘comet crumb’ detector

    Ocean McIntyreApril 22nd, 2017

    Launched on Dec. 3, 2015, from the European Spaceport in French Guiana, the European Space Agency’s Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder mission is turning out to reveal far more than the elusive gravitational waves it was designed to detect.

  • NASA approves instruments for ESA’s ‘JUICE’ mission

    Jim SharkeyApril 21st, 2017

    NASA's contributions to an upcoming European Space Agency mission have been moved from preliminary design to implementation phase. The "JUICE" mission is scheduled to launch in 2022 and arrive at Jupiter in Oct. 2029. JUICE will spend nearly four years investigating Jupiter's environment and its icy Galilean moons.

  • Where’s the Beef? NASA OA-7 mission takes a look at astronauts’ menu

    Jim SiegelApril 21st, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — One of many challenges of long-duration space travel is storing the necessary food and other supplies. Without a way to replenish supplies, a mission to Mars would have to be self-sustaining. One way of reducing the very large amount of food required for such a trip would be to grow some of that food on the way.

  • Photo Gallery: ULA launches S.S. John Glenn to orbit

    Derek RichardsonApril 19th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — In conditions reminiscent of American hero John Glenn's Friendship 7 flight in February 1962, Orbital ATK's OA-7 "S.S. John Glenn" Cygnus cargo ship, launching atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket, soared toward orbit to resupply the International Space Station.

  • Orbital ATK completes development milestones in Next Generation Launch program

    SpaceFlight InsiderApril 17th, 2017

    Orbital ATK announced on April 3, 2017, that it has made progress developing its next generation launch vehicle. Over the last 18 months, it has been developing a booster with advanced solid rocket propulsion to be used in intermediate- and large-class vehicles.

  • Planets orbiting double-star systems could support life, study suggests

    Jim SharkeyApril 16th, 2017

    When NASA's Kepler spacecraft first discovered a planet that orbited two stars, comparisons were made to Luke Skywalker's desert home planet Tatooine in the "Star Wars" movies.

  • NASA Video: Saturn moon Enceladus has ingredients for life

    Derek RichardsonApril 13th, 2017

    Using data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn and the Hubble Space Telescope around Earth, scientists have determined that the ringed planet's moon Enceladus, which has a global ocean under its icy surface, has a source of chemical energy – an ingredient for life.

  • Brightness of galaxies measured using New Horizons’ data; probe enters hibernation

    Laurel KornfeldApril 13th, 2017

    A team of astrophysicists is using images captured by NASA's New Horizons probe during its nine-and-a-half-year journey to Pluto to measure the brightness of all the galaxies in the universe.

  • Book Review: Chandra’s Cosmos: Dark Matter, Black Holes, and Other Wonders Revealed by NASA’s Premier X-Ray Observatory

    Jason RhianApril 10th, 2017

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, sent to orbit during STS-93 by Space Shuttle Columbia in 1999, has rewritten what humanity knows about the universe. A new book works to provide some of the little-known details about one of the space agency's Great Observatories.

  • Proposed CubeSat mission to study atmospheric processes on Venus

    Tomasz NowakowskiApril 9th, 2017

    A small CubeSat designed to investigate atmospheric processes on Venus has been recently chosen by NASA for further development. The spacecraft, known as the CubeSat UV Experiment (CUVE), is one of ten missions to study Solar System planets and asteroids, selected by the agency under the Planetary Science Deep Space SmallSat Studies (PSDS3) program.

  • NASA leaders visit Lockheed Martin in Littleton

    SpaceFlight InsiderApril 9th, 2017

    On April 5, 2017, acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot and other top agency officials visited Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Littleton, Colorado, to see progress on the various missions the company is working on.

  • Robotic Refueling Mission leaves ISS

    Heather SmithApril 8th, 2017

    After a six-year stay attached to the International Space Station (ISS), NASA’s Robotic Refueling Mission (RRM) payload made its way back to Earth on March 19, 2017, to burn up in the atmosphere inside the trunk of SpaceX's CRS-10 Dragon spacecraft.