Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: The Range

  • OSIRIS-REx completes critical deep space maneuver

    Jason RhianJanuary 20th, 2017

    Tracking data provided by NASA's Deep Space network has confirmed that the agency's Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is on course for its target – asteroid Bennu.

  • NASA’s Curiosity rover studies possible mud cracks

    Jim SharkeyJanuary 19th, 2017

    Researchers with NASA's "Curiosity" mission have recently been using the Mars rover to study slabs of rock cross-hatched with shallow ridges that may have begun as cracks in drying mud more than 3 billion years ago.

  • San Pedro welcomes SpaceX’s Falcon 9 first stage

    Jason RhianJanuary 18th, 2017

    After a triumphant return-to-flight conducted on Jan. 14, the first stage of SpaceX's Falcon 9 (1029) rocket began its journey home with its entry into the port at San Pedro, California, on Tuesday, January 17.

  • NASA delays contract awards for asteroid mission spacecraft

    Jim SharkeyJanuary 17th, 2017

    NASA is delaying contracts and other awards for its Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM), originally planned for early this year, by a few months because of uncertainty about the space agency's budget.

  • Visions of the road to Mars

    Jason RhianJanuary 15th, 2017

    No planet is more steeped in lore, legend, and romance than Mars. For SpaceFlight Insider's illustrator James Vaughan, the Red Planet is a subject matter well suited for his unique style of photo-illustration. He spoke with us about how interest in Mars is increasing and how his work is racing to keep up.

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: 12 years ago, Huygens touched down on Titan

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 14th, 2017

    Twelve years ago, on January 14, 2005, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Huygens probe touched down on the surface of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, where it collected images and data about a world viewed by many scientists as an analog of early Earth.

  • Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex highlights NASA’s Commercial Crew and Cargo Programs

    Jason RhianJanuary 14th, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — Just after the 2016 Thanksgiving holiday, NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex unveiled in the West wing of the IMAX Theater a display showcasing spacecraft that are being used on NASA's Commercial Crew and Cargo endeavors.

  • Massive SLS test stand completed at Marshall

    David BrownJanuary 13th, 2017

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located in Huntsville, Alabama, recently marked the completion of major construction for Test Stand 4693, wrapping up work that began in May 2014. Engineers will now connect networks of cables, pipes, valves control systems, cameras, and other equipment needed to test the massive Space Launch System (SLS) hydrogen tank.

  • Mars Curiosity rover pauses to check for dust in its eye

    Bart LeahyJanuary 13th, 2017

    NASA's "Curiosity" rover – a.k.a. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission – delayed its travels because a robotic arm fault prevented the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) from putting the dust cover over its lens overnight. Curiosity's science team put any further roving and science for Sol 1576 on hold pending resolution of the fault.

  • Charon protects Pluto’s atmosphere from solar wind

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 12th, 2017

    Pluto's largest moon, Charon, acts as a barrier between the solar wind and Pluto's atmosphere, preventing that atmosphere from being stripped away when the large moon is positioned between the Sun and Pluto, according to a new study published in the journal Icarus.

  • Martian polar ice caps revealed in 3-D

    Paul KnightlyJanuary 10th, 2017

    Three-dimensional subsurface images are revealing unprecedented new insights into the structure of the Martian polar ice caps. The 3-D images were produced by data from the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) over the course of more than 2,000 orbital passes over each Martian pole.

  • New NASA mission could solve mystery of asteroid Psyche’s water

    Tomasz NowakowskiJanuary 10th, 2017

    Although Psyche is thought to be made of metal, scientists have recently found the presence of water on this minor planet. The new findings could be confirmed and further studied by a newly announced NASA mission – also named Psyche.

  • Arianespace chosen to launch Intelsat 39

    Jason RhianJanuary 9th, 2017

    On Jan. 4, French-based Arianespace announced that it had been selected as the launch service provider for the Intelsat 39 telecommunications satellite. Intelsat 39 is now scheduled to be launched atop an Ariane 5 rocket from the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana.

  • Pluto’s bladed terrain has snow, ice features similar to those on Earth

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 8th, 2017

    Scientists using a computer model, much like those used to study Earth's climate, have identified bowl-shaped ridges in Pluto's bladed or "snakeskin" terrain that resemble similar structures on Earth.

  • OSIRIS-REx begins hunt for elusive ‘Trojan’ asteroids

    Joe LatrellJanuary 7th, 2017

    After successfully launching in September of last year (2016), OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer) has been given a new task – to hunt for "Trojan" asteroids that may pose a danger to Earth.