Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: Saturn V

  • Our Spaceflight Heritage: Apollo 11 then and now

    Collin SkocikJuly 24th, 2016

    Forty-seven years ago, the United States—and more importantly, the human race—did something extraordinary: We launched Apollo 11 and landed, on July 20, 1969, two men on the surface of the Moon. It was the culmination of a decade of hard work, dedication, ever-more-ambitious space missions, the rapid development of new technologies, and costly failure.

  • Our Spaceflight Heritage: The shocking launch of Apollo 12

    Collin SkocikNovember 14th, 2015

    On Nov. 14, 1969, at 11:22 a.m. EST (15:22 GMT), at Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the second manned Moon landing mission launched. The gigantic, 363-foot-tall Saturn V rocket boosted a tiny, three-man capsule carrying Commander Pete Conrad, Command Module Pilot Dick Gordon, and Lunar Module Pilot Alan Bean to the Moon.

  • Still unidentified, WT1190F falls to Earth tonight

    Laurel KornfeldNovember 12th, 2015

    An unidentified object discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on Oct. 3 will fall to Earth tonight, burning up in the sky about 60 miles (100 km) off the coast of Sri Lanka. Designated WT1190F, the six-foot wide object is believed to possibly be an old rocket booster used to launch one of the Apollo Moon missions, China's Chang'e 3 Moon lander, or some older mission.

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: One giant leap, the flight of Apollo 11

    Gregory CecilJuly 16th, 2015

    Forty-six years ago today, on July 16, 1969, the crew of Apollo 11 lifted off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida – for the Moon. At 9:32 a.m. EDT (13:32 GMT), the Saturn V rocket SA-506 lifted off with 7.5 million lbs. of thrust carrying the crew consisting of Neil Armstrong, […]

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: Skylab 1, America’s first space station

    Jason RhianMay 14th, 2015

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla — Lifting off from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A at 1:37 p.m. EDT (16:37 GMT), Skylab 1, the United States’ first space station, was launched forty-two years ago today on May 14, 1973. The scientific and observational platform would remain on orbit for a little more than six years, falling […]

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: A successful failure – 45 years later

    Gregory CecilApril 17th, 2015

    Forty five years ago today, as the nation held its collective breath, Apollo 13 successfully splashed down in the Pacific Ocean. Jim Lovell, Fred Haise Jr., and John “Jack” Swigert had lifted off from Launch Complex 39A from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center atop a Saturn V rocket on April 11, 1970, on what the public had considered a […]

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: 50 years since the first full Saturn V test fire

    James RiceApril 16th, 2015

    Fifty years ago, on April 16, 1965, the full power of the Saturn V was felt for the first time in a test stand firing of the cluster of five F-1 first stage (S-IC) engines at NASA’s Marshall Spaceflight Center located in Huntsville, Alabama. The five F-1 engines burned for 6.5 seconds and produced 7.5 […]

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: Apollo 17 – NASA’s last manned mission to the Moon – 42 years later

    Jason RhianDecember 11th, 2014

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fl — When one thinks of the space age, one thinks of gleaming white rockets and astronauts boldly exploring the cosmos. However, the most recent mission that saw astronauts travel beyond the gravitational sphere of our world – is now 42 years in the past. On Dec. 11, 1972, the last manned […]

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: Apollo 4’s historic echoes

    Jason RhianNovember 9th, 2014

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla — On Nov. 9, 1967, at 8 a.m. EST (1200 GMT) NASA carried out the Apollo 4 mission. It was the first flight of NASA’s Saturn V booster. It marked the first flight of the Saturn V as well as the Apollo spacecraft. The mission lasted almost nine hours, splashing down […]

  • OPINION: Tone down the political rhetoric around space issues

    Collin SkocikSeptember 7th, 2014

    The partisan divide in America is deep and frightening. There seems to be little, if any civil discourse between the two prevailing political ideologies of the day—liberal and conservative. And since President Obama canceled the Constellation Program, many on the right have attempted to claim the space platform as their own.

  • Bruce McCandless, Capcom for Apollo 11, visits Kennedy Space Center, discusses historic mission

    SpaceFlight InsiderJuly 21st, 2014

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla — Bruce McCandless II was on site at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor’s Complex for the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing this week. McCandless served as Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM) for the first lunar spacewalk.

  • Our Spaceflight Heritage: The Journey Begins

    Heather SmithJuly 16th, 2014

    Forty-five years ago today, on July 16, 1969, three astronauts were launched aboard a Saturn V rocket from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch of Apollo 11 was the start of NASA’s first attempt to land men on the Moon. It would mark the beginning of a brief period in time, when humanity walked on […]

  • Our Spaceflight Heritage: the legacy and milestones of Skylab

    Heather SmithJuly 11th, 2014

    Thirty-five years ago today on July 11, 1979, Skylab reentered the Earth’s atmosphere after nearly six years in orbit above our world. Skylab was the first U.S. manned space station to be sent aloft. It was designed to house three crew members per mission and proved that humans could live and work in outer space […]

  • Book Review: Neil Armstrong: A Life of Flight

    Scott JohnsonJuly 5th, 2014

    Longtime NBC News Space Correspondent, Jay Barbree, has written a new book, entitled: Neil Armstrong: A Life of Flight (Macmillan Publishers / St. Martins’s Press / Thomas Dunne Books), which is scheduled for release next week – on July 8. Barbree has authored several prior books (on spaceflight and other topics) and is the only […]

  • Opinion: Why a Mars flyby mission?

    Collin SkocikMay 25th, 2014

    Lately there have been several proposals to launch manned missions to circle past the planet Mars and return to Earth. Inspiration Mars, is a nonprofit venture that is working to launch a manned Mars flyby in 2018, when Earth and Mars are at opposition. The House Appropriations Committee just authorized NASA to study the feasibility of launching […]