Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: New Horizons

  • Seven co-investigators join New Horizons team

    Laurel KornfeldMarch 17th, 2017

    In anticipation of New Horizons' flyby of its second target – Kuiper Belt Object 2014 MU69 – on January 1, 2019, NASA and Principal Investigator Alan Stern have added seven new co-investigators to the mission team.

  • Name themes for Pluto system features approved by IAU

    Laurel KornfeldFebruary 26th, 2017

    A set of naming themes for features on Pluto and its five moons, informally used by the New Horizons mission, has been approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), which has overseen the naming of celestial objects and their surface features since 1919.

  • New Horizons posters, studies, to be presented at Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    Laurel KornfeldFebruary 14th, 2017

    Seven poster sessions and seven studies based on data returned by the New Horizons mission will be presented at the 48th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, which will be held in The Woodlands, Texas, on March 20–24 of this year (2017).

  • Six New Horizons scientists propose geophysical planet definition

    Laurel KornfeldFebruary 8th, 2017

    Six scientists who work on NASA's New Horizons mission propose a geophysical planet definition in an abstract from a presentation to be made at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

  • Pluto’s red regions may have been created by Charon-forming impact

    Laurel KornfeldFebruary 3rd, 2017

    The dark red regions around Pluto's equator may have their origins in the giant impact that formed its moon Charon four billion years ago, according to a team of Japanese researchers.

  • New Horizons performs course correction on path toward second target

    Laurel KornfeldFebruary 3rd, 2017

    After spending six days in a special mode to capture distant photographs of six Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), the New Horizons probe underwent a minor course correction engine burn sending it toward its second flyby target, KBO 2014 MU69.

  • New Horizons video simulates Pluto landing; Charon had icy tectonic plates

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 29th, 2017

    NASA's New Horizons mission team has released a video simulating a landing on Pluto's surface; it is made up of over 100 images taken by the spacecraft during its July 14, 2015, flyby of the dwarf planet.

  • Charon protects Pluto’s atmosphere from solar wind

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 12th, 2017

    Pluto's largest moon, Charon, acts as a barrier between the solar wind and Pluto's atmosphere, preventing that atmosphere from being stripped away when the large moon is positioned between the Sun and Pluto, according to a new study published in the journal Icarus.

  • Pluto’s bladed terrain has snow, ice features similar to those on Earth

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 8th, 2017

    Scientists using a computer model, much like those used to study Earth's climate, have identified bowl-shaped ridges in Pluto's bladed or "snakeskin" terrain that resemble similar structures on Earth.

  • Pluto’s subsurface ocean could possibly support primitive life

    Laurel KornfeldDecember 6th, 2016

    A subsurface ocean, and possibly primitive life, may exist beneath Pluto's "Sputnik Planitia" – the western lobe of its iconic 'heart' feature.

  • New theory proposes weather, not impact, produced Pluto’s Sputnik Planitia

    Laurel KornfeldDecember 1st, 2016

    An impacting object might not be the cause of the formation of Sputnik Planitia – the left side of Pluto's now famous 'heart' feature – as previously thought. This is according to a new theory proposed by Douglas Hamilton of the University of Maryland. He argues the basin could have formed as a result of the dwarf planet's spin axis and unusual climate.

  • Evidence mounts for subsurface ocean on Pluto

    Laurel KornfeldNovember 17th, 2016

    Three new studies based on data returned by New Horizons add to existing evidence that Pluto harbors a subsurface ocean. The studies focus on the very bright Sputnik Planitia, the left side of Tombaugh Regio and Pluto's iconic "heart", which featured prominently in the first photos returned during the July 2015 flyby.

  • Final Pluto data returned by New Horizons, but analysis is just beginning

    Laurel KornfeldNovember 3rd, 2016

    Fifteen months after New Horizons' historic Pluto flyby, the spacecraft has finally returned the last of the data it had collected about the Pluto system.

  • New Horizons shows possible clouds on Pluto, target KBO reddish

    Laurel KornfeldOctober 20th, 2016

    Data presented by New Horizons mission scientists at the current American Astronomical Society (AAS) Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) Conference suggest possible clouds in Pluto's hazy atmosphere, and also show the spacecraft's second target, Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69, to have the same reddish color as Pluto.

  • New data sheds light on composition of Pluto’s frozen ‘heart’

    Laurel KornfeldSeptember 27th, 2016

    Computer models based on data collected by the New Horizons mission team are shedding light on the formation and structure of Sputnik Planum, the left side of Pluto's iconic 'heart' feature.