Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: New Horizons

  • Atmospheric haze makes Pluto colder than previously thought

    Laurel KornfeldNovember 18th, 2017

    When NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft flew by Pluto in July 2015, its instruments found the dwarf planet’s atmospheric temperature to be significantly colder than scientists had expected.

  • Public invited to vote on nicknames for New Horizons’ next target

    Laurel KornfeldNovember 8th, 2017

    With just a little over a year remaining until New Horizons' flyby of 2014 MU69, NASA is asking the public for help in choosing a nickname for the Kuiper Belt Object (KBO).

  • Pluto’s bladed terrain is product of its complex geological history

    Laurel KornfeldSeptember 30th, 2017

    A new study of Pluto's bizarre bladed terrain, which stretches as high as skyscrapers on Earth, has identified them as being composed largely of methane ice, formed through erosion caused by long-term changes in the dwarf planet's climate.

  • Wakened from its latest hibernation, New Horizons may visit additional Kuiper Belt Objects

    Laurel KornfeldSeptember 16th, 2017

    Newly awakened from a five-month hibernation, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft may visit a third Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) after flying by 2014 MU69 on Jan. 1, 2019. Mission scientists at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL) received confirmation from NASA's Deep Space Network in Madrid, Spain, that the probe exited hibernation mode on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017.

  • New Horizons sets flight plan for 2nd target; IAU accepts Pluto system names

    Laurel KornfeldSeptember 9th, 2017

    NASA's New Horizons mission has filed a flight plan for its January 1, 2019, flyby of Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69, which will bring the spacecraft three times closer to its second target than it came to Pluto during the upcoming encounter.

  • New Horizons’ KBO target may be a binary

    Laurel KornfeldAugust 4th, 2017

    New Horizons' second target – Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69 – may actually be a binary system composed of two objects that either touch one another or orbit very close together, according to observations conducted by mission scientists when the KBO passed in front of a star on July 17, 2017.

  • New Horizons team obtains wealth of data from 2014 MU69 occultation

    Laurel KornfeldJuly 24th, 2017

    NASA's New Horizons team captured crucial data on Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69 – the spacecraft's second target – during a third organized observation of the KBO occulting a star on Monday, July 17, 2017.

  • NASA releases New Horizons flyover video

    NASAJuly 15th, 2017

    Using actual New Horizons data and digital elevation models of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, mission scientists have created flyover movies that offer spectacular new perspectives of the many unusual features that were discovered and which have reshaped our views of the Pluto system – from a vantage point even closer than the spacecraft itself.

  • Occultation data raises questions about New Horizons’ target KBO

    Laurel KornfeldJuly 8th, 2017

    Data collected on NASA's New Horizons spacecraft's second flyby target, 2014 MU69, during its June 3 occultation of a star, may indicate the Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) is smaller and brighter than previously thought.

  • New Horizons scientists study KBO by observing star occultation

    Laurel KornfeldJune 23rd, 2017

    A total of 54 New Horizons observation teams successfully obtained crucial data about the spacecraft's second target, 2014 MU69, when the Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) occulted (or passed in front of) a star on the night of June 2–3.

  • Stellar occultations by KBO 2014 MU69 will give scientists crucial data

    Laurel KornfeldMay 28th, 2017

    Members of NASA's New Horizons team will have three opportunities to obtain crucial data regarding 2014 MU69 – the mission's second target – when the Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) occults three different stars within the next few weeks.

  • Planetary scientists explore possible Kuiper Belt follow-up mission

    Laurel KornfeldMay 8th, 2017

    Less than two years after the New Horizons spacecraft's historic Pluto flyby, a group of planetary scientists is taking the first steps toward a second mission to the Kuiper Belt.

  • Brightness of galaxies measured using New Horizons’ data; probe enters hibernation

    Laurel KornfeldApril 13th, 2017

    A team of astrophysicists is using images captured by NASA's New Horizons probe during its nine-and-a-half-year journey to Pluto to measure the brightness of all the galaxies in the universe.

  • New Horizons reaches halfway mark between Pluto and second target

    Laurel KornfeldApril 6th, 2017

    NASA's New Horizons spacecraft reached the halfway point between Pluto and its second flyby target, KBO 2014 MU69, at midnight UTC on Monday, April 3 (8:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday, April 2) at a distance of 486.19 million miles (782.45 million kilometers) from Pluto and the same distance to MU69.

  • Seven co-investigators join New Horizons team

    Laurel KornfeldMarch 17th, 2017

    In anticipation of New Horizons' flyby of its second target – Kuiper Belt Object 2014 MU69 – on January 1, 2019, NASA and Principal Investigator Alan Stern have added seven new co-investigators to the mission team.