Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: NASA

  • NASA offers another chance to send your name to Mars with Insight mission

    Jim SharkeyOctober 8th, 2017

    When NASA's InSight lander reaches Mars in November 2018, it will carry with it hundreds of thousands of names from members of the public. In 2015, nearly 827,000 people signed up to add their names to a silicon microchip onboard the robotic spacecraft. NASA is now adding another microchip, giving the public a second chance to send their names to Mars. 

  • NASA to Bigelow: One BEAM to stay up?

    Curt GodwinOctober 6th, 2017

    More than halfway through its planned two-year demonstration mission to the International Space Station (ISS), Bigelow Aerospace's Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) is performing so well that NASA is considering extending the habitat's stay at the orbiting outpost.

  • Major core stage hardware completed for first SLS flight

    Heather SmithOctober 4th, 2017

    NASA has completed major work for all five parts of the core stage for the first flight of the massive Space Launch System (SLS). Additionally, manufacturing has been completed for all four core stage test articles with evaluation underway on the engine section structural test article at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  • Solar storm sparks global aurora, doubles radiation levels on Mars

    Ocean McIntyreOctober 4th, 2017

    An unexpectedly strong solar storm proved once again that the Sun, our closest star, is a remarkably powerful orb that exerts a huge influence over the bodies within the Solar System.

  • Parker Solar Probe gets its sunshield

    Christopher PaulOctober 3rd, 2017

    The Parker Solar Probe (formerly named the Solar Probe Plus) had its revolutionary solar heat shield installed on September 21, 2017, at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. The Parker Solar Probe will be launched on a Delta IV Heavy from Cape Canaveral on a mission that will take it closer to the Sun than any spacecraft in history.

  • Pluto’s bladed terrain is product of its complex geological history

    Laurel KornfeldSeptember 30th, 2017

    A new study of Pluto's bizarre bladed terrain, which stretches as high as skyscrapers on Earth, has identified them as being composed largely of methane ice, formed through erosion caused by long-term changes in the dwarf planet's climate.

  • NASA reschedules launch of Webb Telescope for spring 2019

    Jim SharkeySeptember 30th, 2017

    The launch of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has been rescheduled to occur sometime between March and June 2019 from French Guiana. The delay follows a schedule assessment of the remaining integration and test activities that need to occur prior to launch. The JWST was previously scheduled to launch in October 2018.

  • Boeing hints at delayed first crewed flight of Starliner

    Bart LeahySeptember 29th, 2017

    Speaking at the International Astronautical Congress (IAC) in Adelaide, Australia, on September 26, 2017, Chris Ferguson, director of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner crew and mission systems, discussed testing of the company’s commercial crew spacecraft.

  • NASA, Roscosmos sign statement on lunar space station cooperation

    Curt GodwinSeptember 28th, 2017

    Continuing a tradition of cooperative partnership in space exploration, the respective space agencies of the United States and Russia signed a joint statement to develop a space station in lunar orbit. NASA and Roscosmos made the announcement on Sept. 27, 2017, at the 68th International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide, Australia.

  • ‘When We Were Apollo’ documentary about Apollo’s undiscovered heroes launches crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter

    Press ReleaseSeptember 28th, 2017

    LOS ANGELES, Calif. — Sept. 26, 2017 — Contact Light Films announced today the first phase of funding for its feature-length documentary film When We Were Apollo (W3A), currently in pre-production, launching a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter.

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: The decade of Dawn

    Ocean McIntyreSeptember 27th, 2017

    When the Dawn mission finally launched on September 27, 2007, many saw it as practically miraculous. The spacecraft had survived numerous cancellations and delays, and it was only with concerted effort that the mission was reinstated. Dawn had an audacious mandate, to do something that hadn't been attempted before – to travel to one body and then depart and head to another.

  • NASA’s OSIRIS-REx set for Earth flyby on way to Asteroid Bennu

    Ocean McIntyreSeptember 21st, 2017

    Traveling at a staggering 19,000 miles (30,758 km) per hour, NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will fly past its homeworld on its way to the asteroid Bennu. The slingshot maneuver will provide the Lockheed Martin-built probe with a push to an inclination of six degrees – the angle that Bennu orbits the Sun – from Earth's orbital plane and onward to the rocky leftover from the Solar System's formation.

  • SpaceX CRS-12 mission comes to a close with Dragon’s splashdown

    Curt GodwinSeptember 18th, 2017

    After spending a month berthed to the International Space Station (ISS), SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft marked the end of its CRS-12 mission with a successful splashdown at 10:14 a.m. EDT (14:14 GMT) on Sept. 17, 2017. The spacecraft returned with an estimated 3,800 pounds (1,724 kg) of cargo and was secured and taken aboard a waiting recovery ship.

  • Cassini: The legend and legacy of one of NASA’s most prolific missions

    Ocean McIntyreSeptember 17th, 2017

    PASADENA, Calif. — Just one month shy of twenty years in space, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft dramatically ended its mission in the early morning hours at approximately 4:55 a.m. PDT (7:55 a.m. EDT / 11:55 GMT) Earth-Received Time (ERT) on Friday, September 15, 2017.

  • Curiosity rover begins climb of ‘Vera Rubin Ridge’

    Jim SharkeySeptember 17th, 2017

    NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has started the steep climb of an iron-oxide bearing ridge on the northwestern flank of Mount Sharp that has long been of interest to researchers. "Vera Rubin Ridge", also known as "Hematite Ridge", was informally named in early 2017 in memory of pioneering astrophysicist Vera Cooper Rubin, whose research provided evidence for the existence of dark matter.