Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: NASA

  • Cygnus OA-8 cargo spacecraft departs ISS

    Heather SmithDecember 6th, 2017

    The Orbital ATK Cygnus OA-8 cargo spacecraft departed from the International Space Station at 8:11 a.m. EST (13:11 GMT) on Wednesday, December 6, 2017, after delivering almost 7,400 pounds (3,356 kg) of cargo to support science experiments.

  • Launch of SpaceX Falcon 9 with CRS-13 slips again

    Jason RhianDecember 6th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the CRS-13 Dragon spacecraft has slipped again, with NASA stating that the new launch time is now Dec. 12, with the "instantaneous" launch window opening at 11:46 a.m. EST (16:46 GMT) from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida.

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: Voyager 1 – the Energizer Bunny

    Jason RhianDecember 4th, 2017

    The Energizer Bunny keeps going and going – and so does NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft. More to the point, so does the craft's thrusters. Over three-and-a-half decades after they were last fired, the probe's thrusters were successfully fired on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. 

  • Vote on names for New Horizons’ second target extended to Dec. 6

    Laurel KornfeldDecember 3rd, 2017

    NASA's public campaign seeking name suggestions for New Horizons' second target, 2014 MU69, has garnered so many creative suggestions that its deadline has been extended for another five days.

  • NASA plans ‘souped-up’ rover for Mars 2020 mission

    Jim SharkeyDecember 1st, 2017

    The rover for NASA's Mars 2020 mission bears a strong resemblance to the Curiosity rover currently exploring the surface of Mars. However, it will have a number of improvements and instruments to carry out its search for signs of past microbial life on the Red Planet. A recent NASA press release described the rover as a "souped-up science machine".

  • Study: Exploration of Special Regions needed to find alien life on Mars

    Tomasz NowakowskiNovember 28th, 2017

    An international team of researchers has conducted a study endorsing the exploration of the so-called Special Regions on Mars. They call for the relaxation of the planetary protection policy in order to allow sending robotic explorers to the restricted areas that could potentially host microbial life.

  • NASA, Department of Energy testing ‘Kilopower’ space nuclear reactor

    Collin SkocikNovember 26th, 2017

    In preparing for possible missions to the Red Planet in the near future, NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) has been given the go-ahead to test a small nuclear reactor that could one day run equipment on the Martian surface.

  • NASA’s InSight lander completes thermal vacuum testing

    Derek RichardsonNovember 25th, 2017

    The next robotic mission to Mars, NASA's InSight lander, has undergone a thermal vacuum (TVAC) test to ensure it can survive the six-month journey to the Red Planet. The spacecraft is set to launch in May 2018.

  • Research suggests limited role for water in Mars recurring slope lineae

    Paul KnightlyNovember 25th, 2017

    Water may play a less significant role than previously thought in recurring slope lineae on Mars according to a paper published in Nature Geoscience on Nov. 20. Recurring slope lineae, or RSL, are dark seasonal slope streaks that occur on slope faces in some regions of Mars.

  • Insider Exclusive: America’s ‘Booster Belt’ Part Three (conclusion) – Marshall

    Jason RhianNovember 24th, 2017

    HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- We were headed out to the final stop of our tour of Marshall Space Flight Center where we would be shown the test stands that are being prepared to validate the various components that will comprise NASA's new crew-rated rocket - the Space Launch System.

  • Insider Exclusive: America’s ‘Booster Belt’ Part Three (continued) – Marshall

    Jason RhianNovember 23rd, 2017

    HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- SpaceFlight Insider continued its tour of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center with a stop to speak with Heather Haney, NASA's SLS (Space Launch System) Stages Element Test Manager. She detailed the work being done to ready the massive new rocket's core stage ready for its inaugural flight.

  • Expedition 53 celebrates Thanksgiving on ISS

    Derek RichardsonNovember 23rd, 2017

    Astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station have now celebrated 18 Thanksgivings in orbit since 2000. This year, it was Expedition 53’s turn to share their thoughts and memories of the holiday.

  • First science targets of NASA’s Webb telescope announced

    Jim SharkeyNovember 23rd, 2017

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is scheduled to launch in spring 2019. The space agency recently announced the early release observing programs that will be completed within the first five months of Webb's science operations.

  • First SLS hardware turned over to Ground Systems for EM-1 flight

    Bart LeahyNovember 22nd, 2017

    NASA reports that the rocket stage designated to accelerate the Orion spacecraft to the Moon in 2019 has been turned over to the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) team at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The flight stage – called the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS) – is being processed for Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), the first integrated flight of the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion.

  • Largest space telescope ever fielded, LUVOIR, could aid in search for alien life

    Florida TechNovember 21st, 2017

    In terms of space exploration and information, NASA has had to answer the question of "What is next?" The agency continues to work to answer this question with new and ever-more complex programs. Spacecraft such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) have and are aiming to continue revolutionizing humanity's knowledge of the Cosmos. However, there is another possible answer to "What is next?" – LUVOIR.