Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: NASA

  • NASA gives Dawn mission second extension

    Laurel KornfeldOctober 22nd, 2017

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft, which has been orbiting Ceres since March 2015, has just been given a second extension, which will be used to bring the probe into the closest orbit yet around the dwarf planet.

  • Mars hydrothermal deposits hint at habitable conditions

    Ocean McIntyreOctober 21st, 2017

    A recent report in Nature Communications indicates that ancient Mars may have had deep sea-floor hydrothermal activity. Hydrothermal deposits on Earth are associated with the earliest signs of life and habitable environments today. Their detection on Mars has implications for the possibility of ancient life on the Red Planet.

  • Facebook Live chat kicks off ‘Year of Education’ at ISS

    Benjamin O'BrienOctober 20th, 2017

    NASA’s Year of Education on Station kicked off on October 16, 2017, via Facebook Live, when NASA Public Affairs Officers Brandi Dean and Kirk Shireman contacted NASA astronaut Joe Acaba and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Paolo Nespoli up at the ISS to talk with students and teachers across the nation about their lives on the station and the work they do.

  • Merging neutron stars emit both gravitational waves and light

    Laurel KornfeldOctober 18th, 2017

    In a major milestone for astronomy, the merger of two neutron stars in the galaxy NGC 4993 produced both gravitational waves and light, enabling scientists to observe the event in various wavelengths and pinpoint its source.

  • Parker Solar Probe approved for environmental testing

    Christopher PaulOctober 18th, 2017

    The Parker Solar Probe, formerly called Solar Probe Plus, has been certified ready for environmental testing. This means that engineers have inspected the spacecraft and have decided it is ready to be subjected to simulations of the conditions it will face during its launch and operations in space.

  • Progress MS-07 freighter docks with International Space Station

    Derek RichardsonOctober 16th, 2017

    After spending two days catching up with the International Space Station, an automated Russian cargo freighter rendezvoused and docked with the outpost to supply the Expedition 53 crew with food and supplies.

  • Satellite data shows largest CO2 increase comes from Earth’s tropics

    Laurel KornfeldOctober 16th, 2017

    Data collected by NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite, launched in 2014 to measure changing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) worldwide, indicate Earth's tropics have been the largest sources of recent CO2 emissions.

  • GAO: Even with production resumed, NASA plutonium supply at risk

    Bart LeahyOctober 15th, 2017

    Some of NASA’s most accomplished deep-space missions—including Voyager, Cassini, and Mars Science Laboratory—have relied on radioactive plutonium-238 for onboard power and heat. However, a recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) report states that despite efforts to restart domestic plutonium production, NASA is in danger of not having enough of the radioactive material for future missions by the mid-2020s.

  • Astronauts breeze through US EVA-45

    Derek RichardsonOctober 10th, 2017

    Less than a week after completing one spacewalk, International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 53 astronauts Randy Bresnik and Mark Vande Hei set out on another extravehicular activity (EVA). This excursion, U.S. EVA-45 lasted about 6.5 hours.

  • NASA Glenn tests solar electric propulsion thruster for journey to metal world

    Michael ColeOctober 9th, 2017

    NASA is preparing to travel to a world unlike any other it has visited before. The agency has sent spacecraft to terrestrial planets, gaseous planets, icy moons, and rocky asteroids. Now, following its approval as a Discovery mission in February of this year, a spacecraft set for launch in 2022 will visit the main-belt asteroid Psyche, a metal world that scientists think is made almost entirely of nickel and iron.

  • Dust cloud could be reason for strange dimming of Tabby’s star

    Laurel KornfeldOctober 8th, 2017

    The unusual dimming of Tabby's Star, for which a variety of explanations, including an alien "megastructure", have been proposed, is likely caused by an irregularly shaped dust cloud orbiting the star, according to a new study.

  • NASA offers another chance to send your name to Mars with Insight mission

    Jim SharkeyOctober 8th, 2017

    When NASA's InSight lander reaches Mars in November 2018, it will carry with it hundreds of thousands of names from members of the public. In 2015, nearly 827,000 people signed up to add their names to a silicon microchip onboard the robotic spacecraft. NASA is now adding another microchip, giving the public a second chance to send their names to Mars. 

  • NASA to Bigelow: One BEAM to stay up?

    Curt GodwinOctober 6th, 2017

    More than halfway through its planned two-year demonstration mission to the International Space Station (ISS), Bigelow Aerospace's Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) is performing so well that NASA is considering extending the habitat's stay at the orbiting outpost.

  • Major core stage hardware completed for first SLS flight

    Heather SmithOctober 4th, 2017

    NASA has completed major work for all five parts of the core stage for the first flight of the massive Space Launch System (SLS). Additionally, manufacturing has been completed for all four core stage test articles with evaluation underway on the engine section structural test article at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  • Solar storm sparks global aurora, doubles radiation levels on Mars

    Ocean McIntyreOctober 4th, 2017

    An unexpectedly strong solar storm proved once again that the Sun, our closest star, is a remarkably powerful orb that exerts a huge influence over the bodies within the Solar System.