Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: NASA

  • Opportunity rover takes ‘Sprained Ankle’ Panorama

    Jim SharkeyJuly 26th, 2017

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover "Opportunity" recently recorded a panoramic view before entering the "Perseverance Valley", which descends the inner slope of Endeavour Crater's rim. The valley is a major destination for the rover's extended mission.

  • Newly developed Nanotube Technology could revolutionize spaceflight

    Michael ColeJuly 26th, 2017

    A cold-gas thruster system, partially made from carbon nanotube material, was recently tested aboard a Black Brant IX suborbital sounding rocket. Part of the thruster system was a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV).

  • OPINION: Is there inconsistency in how NASA treats its private partners?

    Jason RhianJuly 23rd, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A recent report noted that NASA will not be releasing a public report on the findings of the SpaceX Falcon 9 CRS-7 explosion. The report also denotes that a previous similar accident was handled differently by NASA, but were the two accidents so distinct as to warrant two totally dissimilar approaches?

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: The Shuttle replacement that never was

    Christopher PaulJuly 22nd, 2017

    When the Space Shuttle was first proposed it was meant to be “all things to all users” – a replacement for all U.S. launch vehicles. All the expendable launchers, Atlas, Titan, and Delta would retire and the shuttle would be responsible for all U.S. launches from its three pads: LC-39A / -39B at Kennedy Space Center, and SLC-6 at Vandenberg Air Force Base.

  • NanoRacks airlock moving toward 2019 installation on the ISS

    Jim SiegelJuly 21st, 2017

    Five months ago, NanoRacks LLC announced it would partner with Boeing to build the first private airlock for the International Space Station. That initiative is progressing and recently achieved a design milestone with the successful test of a NASA-built, full-scale mockup at the Johnson Space Center in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL).

  • Brown dwarf discovered with the help of citizen scientists

    Ocean McIntyreJuly 20th, 2017

    Sometimes in science, when you search for one thing, you end up finding something completely different. Such is the case with the search for the thus far elusive Planet Nine and the citizen scientists who ended up finding a brown dwarf instead.

  • Our Spaceflight Heritage: 48 years since Apollo 11 landed on the Moon

    Collin SkocikJuly 20th, 2017

    On July 20, 1969 – 48 years ago today – the world was changed forever when two human beings walked on the Moon. 38-year-old Neil Armstrong stepped off the ladder of the flimsy, spidery Lunar Module "Eagle" onto the soft and pliant dust of the Moon’s Sea of Tranquillity (Mare Tranquillitatis) and spoke the immortal words: “That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind.”

  • Sierra Nevada ground tests Dream Chaser’s steering, brakes

    Bart LeahyJuly 18th, 2017

    On Monday, July 17, SNC put its full-scale Dream Chaser test vehicle through its paces on the ground at NASA’s Armstrong Research Center in California. According to a report by Spaceflight Now, the ground tests towed the vehicle fast enough to evaluate the performance of its brakes, steering, guidance, navigation, and control systems.

  • AIDA mission to validate crucial asteroid deflection technology

    Tomasz NowakowskiJuly 16th, 2017

    NASA and ESA are developing the Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission; its main goal is to demonstrate the kinetic impact technique that could change the motion of a potentially hazardous asteroid.

  • TDRS-M spacecraft damaged during closeout activities

    Jason RhianJuly 16th, 2017

    TITUSVILLE, Fla. — During closeout activities for the final third-generation Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-M), an "incident" occurred to the spacecraft's Omni S-band antenna. This occurred on Friday, July 14, about two-and-a-half weeks prior to the satellite's scheduled launch.

  • NASA prepares its Martian explorers for solar conjunction radio silence

    Curt GodwinJuly 16th, 2017

    For more than twenty years, NASA has had explorers surveying the Red Planet. Dutifully, the stalwart robotic travelers have followed commands beamed from their Earth-bound handlers and returned gigabytes of information of their Martian observations.

  • NASA releases New Horizons flyover video

    NASAJuly 15th, 2017

    Using actual New Horizons data and digital elevation models of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, mission scientists have created flyover movies that offer spectacular new perspectives of the many unusual features that were discovered and which have reshaped our views of the Pluto system – from a vantage point even closer than the spacecraft itself.

  • Want your own spacesuit? We know a guy…

    Jason RhianJuly 15th, 2017

    We've all been there: watching the astronauts get suited up for their missions beyond our world and come walking out of Kennedy's Operations and Checkout Building (M7-355 O&C) decked out in their flight suits – and wishing it was us. While boarding a spacecraft bound for the black sky is not in the offing anytime soon, one man is working to at least provide you with the appropriate apparel.

  • Curiosity eyes new ridge in exploration of the Red Planet

    Ocean McIntyreJuly 15th, 2017

    After nearly five years of its exploration of the Red Planet, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, more commonly known as the Curiosity rover, will begin its long-awaited study of a tantalizing ridge formation along a slope of Mount Sharp in the center of Gale Crater.

  • Webb telescope to spend summer chilling in Houston

    Jim SharkeyJuly 13th, 2017

    While Houston, Texas, may be sweltering in 95-degree Fahrenheit (35 °C) heat this week, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will soon be chilling in a vibration-insolation "hammock", hanging from the ceiling of Chamber A – an enormous thermal vacuum testing facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center.