Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: NASA

  • NASA mulls purchasing Soyuz seats—from Boeing?

    Derek RichardsonJanuary 20th, 2017

    Despite the Commercial Crew Program being years behind schedule, NASA has said for the last number of months it has no plans to purchase additional Soyuz seats from Russia past the end of 2018. While that may technically hold true, the U.S. space agency is, however looking to buy Soyuz seats acquired by Boeing.

  • OSIRIS-REx completes critical deep space maneuver

    Jason RhianJanuary 20th, 2017

    Tracking data provided by NASA's Deep Space network has confirmed that the agency's Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is on course for its target – asteroid Bennu.

  • NASA’s Curiosity rover studies possible mud cracks

    Jim SharkeyJanuary 19th, 2017

    Researchers with NASA's "Curiosity" mission have recently been using the Mars rover to study slabs of rock cross-hatched with shallow ridges that may have begun as cracks in drying mud more than 3 billion years ago.

  • Orion update for January 2017

    Mackenzie KaneJanuary 18th, 2017

    Before the end of 2016, progress on NASA's Orion capsule for Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) took some significant leaps forward. The coming year looks to be no different – with the crew-rated spacecraft being prepared for its first flight atop SLS.

  • NASA delays contract awards for asteroid mission spacecraft

    Jim SharkeyJanuary 17th, 2017

    NASA is delaying contracts and other awards for its Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM), originally planned for early this year, by a few months because of uncertainty about the space agency's budget.

  • The last man on the Moon, Gene Cernan, passes away at 82

    Bart LeahyJanuary 16th, 2017

    Astronaut Eugene "Gene" A. Cernan died today, Jan. 16, 2017, at age 82. He flew into space three times – aboard Gemini IX in 1966, Apollo 10 in 1969, and as commander of Apollo 17 in 1972. While he resented the hiatus in human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit, he is still known by the title noted in his autobiography, “The Last Man on the Moon.”

  • Visions of the road to Mars

    Jason RhianJanuary 15th, 2017

    No planet is more steeped in lore, legend, and romance than Mars. For SpaceFlight Insider's illustrator James Vaughan, the Red Planet is a subject matter well suited for his unique style of photo-illustration. He spoke with us about how interest in Mars is increasing and how his work is racing to keep up.

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: 12 years ago, Huygens touched down on Titan

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 14th, 2017

    Twelve years ago, on January 14, 2005, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Huygens probe touched down on the surface of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, where it collected images and data about a world viewed by many scientists as an analog of early Earth.

  • Astronauts breeze through spacewalk, complete all get-ahead tasks

    Derek RichardsonJanuary 13th, 2017

    In the second of two planned to spacewalks up upgrade the International Space Station’s (ISS) power system, two astronauts finished the process of replacing 12 nickel-hydrogen batteries with new lithium-ion units. The spacewalking duo worked so fast, they had time to complete all of the assigned get-ahead tasks.

  • Mars Curiosity rover pauses to check for dust in its eye

    Bart LeahyJanuary 13th, 2017

    NASA's "Curiosity" rover – a.k.a. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission – delayed its travels because a robotic arm fault prevented the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) from putting the dust cover over its lens overnight. Curiosity's science team put any further roving and science for Sol 1576 on hold pending resolution of the fault.

  • Astronauts to finish installing batteries during ISS during Friday spacewalk

    Derek RichardsonJanuary 12th, 2017

    The International Space Station (ISS) crew is gearing up for the second of two spacewalks aimed at replacing aging nickel-hydrogen batteries with new lithium-ion units. Two astronauts will leave the Quest airlock at around 7 a.m. EST (12:00 GMT) Jan. 13, 2017, for an estimated six-and-a-half-hour-long excursion.

  • Charon protects Pluto’s atmosphere from solar wind

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 12th, 2017

    Pluto's largest moon, Charon, acts as a barrier between the solar wind and Pluto's atmosphere, preventing that atmosphere from being stripped away when the large moon is positioned between the Sun and Pluto, according to a new study published in the journal Icarus.

  • Astronauts Baker and Fossum retire from NASA

    Rae Botsford EndJanuary 11th, 2017

    On Saturday, Jan. 7, astronauts Mike Baker and Mike Fossum both retired from NASA to pursue work in the private sector. Both of the spaceflight veterans served in the U.S. military, and both wore numerous hats during their time with the space agency.

  • New NASA mission could solve mystery of asteroid Psyche’s water

    Tomasz NowakowskiJanuary 10th, 2017

    Although Psyche is thought to be made of metal, scientists have recently found the presence of water on this minor planet. The new findings could be confirmed and further studied by a newly announced NASA mission – also named Psyche.

  • Pluto’s bladed terrain has snow, ice features similar to those on Earth

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 8th, 2017

    Scientists using a computer model, much like those used to study Earth's climate, have identified bowl-shaped ridges in Pluto's bladed or "snakeskin" terrain that resemble similar structures on Earth.