Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: NASA

  • Astronauts replace Canadarm2 ‘hand’ on ISS in first spacewalk of 2018

    Derek RichardsonJanuary 23rd, 2018

    The first spacewalk of 2018, U.S. EVA 47, is now in the history books after two NASA astronauts completed a nearly 7.5 hour extravehicular activity to replace an aging latching end effector on the International Space Station’s robotic Canadarm2.

  • Juno spacecraft captures stunning images of Jupiter’s cloud tops, storms

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 23rd, 2018

    During its recent close flybys of Jupiter, NASA's Juno spacecraft captured incredible images of the giant planet's cloud tops, storms, and atmosphere that some have compared to Vincent Van Gogh's famous "Starry Night" painting.

  • NASA planning 2 spacewalks to replace Canadarm2 ‘hand’ despite US government shutdown

    Bart LeahyJanuary 20th, 2018

    Despite budget battles in Washington, D.C. resulting in a temporary shutdown of the U.S. federal government, NASA and the International Space Station's Expedition 54 crew still plan to carry out a pair of spacewalks to replace one of the 16-year-old "hands" on the outpost's robotic arm.

  • Aerojet Rocketdyne starts off a busy 2018 with hot fire of RS-25 engine

    Lloyd CampbellJanuary 17th, 2018

    NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne conducted another successful test firing of the Space Launch System’s core stage main engine, the RS-25, on Jan 16 2018.

  • Steep Martian slopes reveal structure of underground ice sheets

    Jim SharkeyJanuary 15th, 2018

    Scientists using NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have located eight sites where thick deposits of ice beneath the Martian surface are exposed in the faces of steep eroding slopes known as scarps. The eight scarps, have slopes as steep as 55 degrees, provide researchers with new information about the internal structure of previously-discovered layered subsurface ice sheets in Mars's middle latitudes.

  • NASA to study weather in boundary layer between Earth and space

    Curt GodwinJanuary 14th, 2018

    While most people tune-in to their local weather forecasts, and there are those who keep their eyes to the sky for the latest in space weather, the region in which they interact has been largely uncharted. NASA - with the help of two satellites planned for launch in 2018 - hopes to change that.

  • SpaceX’s CRS-13 Dragon capsule departs ISS after 4-week stay

    Derek RichardsonJanuary 13th, 2018

    The first visiting vehicle activity at the International Space Station in 2018 concluded Jan. 13 with the unberthing, departure and splashdown of SpaceX’s CRS-13 Dragon cargo ship after spending nearly a month at the orbiting outpost.

  • New Horizons mission invites public to celebrate New Year’s KBO flyby

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 5th, 2018

    The world may have celebrated New Year's 2018 just days ago, but NASA's New Horizons mission is already inviting the public to welcome 2019 with a visit to Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69.

  • NASA’s MAVEN mission providing insights into life on distant worlds

    Jason RhianDecember 31st, 2017

    Mars. Long a destination dreamed of by the public in general and space enthusiasts in particular, is providing insights about the length of time that other planets can support life. How long would a planet like Mars, orbiting a distant red dwarf star be habitable? One of NASA's Scout Program missions is helping to develop an answer.

  • Gallium nitride processor: Next-generation technology for space exploration

    Tomasz NowakowskiDecember 28th, 2017

    A material known as gallium nitride (GaN), poised to become the next semiconductor for power electronics, could also be essential for various space applications. Yuji Zhao, an expert in electrical and computer engineering at Arizona State University (ASU), plans to develop the first ever processor from gallium nitride, which could revolutionize future space exploration missions.

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: The atheist and Apollo 8

    Jason RhianDecember 25th, 2017

    When most people think of Apollo 8, they think of how the Book of Genesis was read from the vicinity of the Moon and the well-wishes the trio of astronauts gave the world. The year 1968 was not a good one in terms of U.S. history, and Apollo 8 ended that dark year on a high note – for most Americans. One exception, an atheist who opted to sue the U.S. government over violations of the first amendment by reading from Genesis on a government-sponsored mission. Who was this person and what happened to them?

  • New Horizons put in final hibernation before 2019 KBO flyby

    Laurel KornfeldDecember 24th, 2017

    A little over a year before its New Year's day 2019 flyby of Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft was put into its final hibernation prior to the visit.

  • Untethered: Humanity’s first free flying astronaut, Bruce McCandless, passes away aged 80

    Jason RhianDecember 22nd, 2017

    The first person to conduct a free, untethered spacewalk, Bruce McCandless II, has passed away at the age of 80. McCandless was a naval aviator and the son of a U.S. Medal of Honor recipient who served as the CAPCOM when Neil Armstrong successfully placed humanity’s first footprints on the Moon and who helped redefine what it was believed astronauts can do.

  • NASA selects finalists for next New Frontiers mission

    Curt GodwinDecember 22nd, 2017

    Choosing from a field of twelve proposals, NASA has recently whittled the group down to two finalists for the agency's next New Frontiers mission. Receiving the nod to receive additional funding and study in 2018 were missions to Saturn's moon Titan and the recent European Space Agency (ESA) target, Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

  • SLS launch pad undergoes water tests in preparation for EM-1

    Jason RhianDecember 21st, 2017

    NASA conducted a wet flow test at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39B on Wednesday, Dec. 20, 2017. The test helped validate a system designed to protect NASA's new super-heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. It also served to confirm it is ready to support the launch vehicle's first flight, Exploration Mission 1, currently slated to take place in 2019.