Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: Lead Stories

  • Orion update: Lighting the fire of awareness – Part 1

    Jason RhianAugust 21st, 2017

    Officials with NASA sat down with SpaceFlight Insider to discuss the current status of the Orion program, which evolved into discussions on how the space agency is working to spread the word about the new crew-rated capsule as well as the ties that the program has with past efforts—and more.

  • ‘Great American Eclipse’ offers opportunity for millions

    Ocean McIntyreAugust 20th, 2017

    On Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, anyone in the United States, most of Canada and northern parts of Mexico, and also some countries in the Caribbean will be able to view either a total or partial solar eclipse that will pass across the entirety of the U.S. from the Pacific to the Atlantic.

  • H-IIA rocket launches 3rd Japanese navigation satellite

    Derek RichardsonAugust 19th, 2017

    Lifting off from the sea-side Tanegashima Space Center, Japan’s H-IIA rocket launched the Asian country’s latest GPS augmentation satellite for the Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS). The launch took place at 1:29 a.m. EDT (5:29 GMT) Aug 19, 2017.

  • Atlas V launches TDRS-M data relay satellite for NASA

    Christopher PaulAugust 18th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket roared off the pad with NASA's newest communications spacecraft, the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite M (TDRS-M). Liftoff took place at 8:29 a.m. EDT (12:29 GMT) Aug. 18, 2017.

  • SFI LIVE: Launch coverage of NASA’s TDRS-M

    Jason RhianAugust 18th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- SpaceFlight Insider is at Kennedy Space Center's Press Site for today's webcast covering the flight of a ULA Atlas V 401 rocket with the third next generation TDRS-M. SFI's Live Show is slated to begin at 7:30 a.m. EDT (11:30 GMT) with the 40-minute launch window opening at 8:03 a.m. EDT (12:03 GMT). 

  • Spacewalk goes into overtime as cosmonauts deploy satellites, collect science

    Derek RichardsonAugust 18th, 2017

    The two cosmonauts on board the International Space Station donned spacesuits and stepped outside the outpost for the 43rd Russian segment-based extravehicular activity (EVA). The Aug. 17, 2017, spacewalk lasted more than an hour longer than planned for a total duration of 7 hours, 34 minutes.

  • Proton-M launches military satellite into orbit

    Tomasz NowakowskiAugust 17th, 2017

    A military communications satellite, known as Blagovest 11L, has been successfully launched into space by a Proton-M / Briz-M heavy-lift rocket. The launch vehicle thundered off from Site 81/24 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at exactly 4:07 a.m. local time on Thursday, Aug. 17 (22:07 GMT / 6:07 p.m. EDT on Aug. 16).

  • Atlas V rolls to pad as TDRS-M is prepared for launch

    Derek RichardsonAugust 17th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is undergoing final preparations in advance of a planned Aug. 18, 2017, liftoff with NASA’s next communications relay satellite. Liftoff of the rocket is targeted for the beginning of a 40-minute window opening at 8:03 a.m. EDT (12:03 GMT).

  • SpaceX’s CRS-12 Dragon capsule arrives at space station

    Derek RichardsonAugust 16th, 2017

    Some 36 hours after leaving Kennedy Space Center atop a Falcon 9 rocket, SpaceX's CRS-12 Dragon capsule rendezvoused with and was berthed to the International Space Station. The cargo spacecraft is carrying more than 6,400 pounds (2,900 kilograms) of supplies and science experiments.

  • Curiosity spots clouds drifting across Martian sky

    Jim SharkeyAugust 15th, 2017

    Wispy clouds resembling Earth's ice-crystal clouds move across the Martian sky in new images from NASA's Curiosity Mars rover. The clouds are the most clearly visible so far from Curiosity, which landed on Mars in Gale Crater five years ago this month. Clouds in the Martian sky have been previously observed by Curiosity and other missions to the Martian surface, including NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

  • SpaceX’s CRS-12 mission sends experiments, crew supplies to space station

    Bart LeahyAugust 14th, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — Without so much as a flinch, SpaceX sent the CRS-12 Dragon cargo spacecraft off to the International Space Station. Liftoff took place at 12:31 p.m. EDT (16:31 GMT) Aug. 14, 2017, within its one-second "instantaneous" launch window. This flight is poised to deliver more than 6,400 pounds (2,900 kilograms) of equipment and supplies to the orbiting outpost in the next 36 hours.

  • Live Coverage: Launch of NASA’s CRS-12 on SpaceX Falcon 9

    Jason RhianAugust 14th, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — NASA and SpaceX are preparing to launch the 12th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station atop one of the company's "Full Thrust" Falcon 9 rockets. Liftoff is currently scheduled for 12:31 p.m. EDT (16:31 GMT) from historic Launch Complex 39A. Tune in here for SpaceX's Live Webcast.

  • JAXA H-IIA launch of GPS satellite canceled

    Bart LeahyAugust 12th, 2017

    In a brief media statement, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) announced that it has canceled today's planned launch of an H-IIA rocket, which is carrying a navigation satellite that is designed to augment the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the Japanese region.

  • Science and technology to get boost from CRS-12 mission

    Jim SiegelAugust 12th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The cargo aboard NASA’s scheduled Aug. 14, 2017, CRS mission to the ISS could help more people than just the six crew and cosmonauts currently living there. With more than three tons of experiments and materials being ferried, SpaceX's Dragon capsule could benefit people ranging from those suffering from Parkinson's disease, to those seeking bio-engineered organs, to soldiers on the battlefield.

  • RS-25 engine flight controller completes 500-second test

    Scott JohnsonAugust 10th, 2017

    On Wednesday, August 9, NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne conducted a 500-second test of an RS-25 developmental engine at the agency's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The test was used to validate the fourth upgraded engine controller required for the first flight of the Space Launch System.