Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

  • Parker Solar Probe approved for environmental testing

    Christopher PaulOctober 18th, 2017

    The Parker Solar Probe, formerly called Solar Probe Plus, has been certified ready for environmental testing. This means that engineers have inspected the spacecraft and have decided it is ready to be subjected to simulations of the conditions it will face during its launch and operations in space.

  • Parker Solar Probe gets its sunshield

    Christopher PaulOctober 3rd, 2017

    The Parker Solar Probe (formerly named the Solar Probe Plus) had its revolutionary solar heat shield installed on September 21, 2017, at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. The Parker Solar Probe will be launched on a Delta IV Heavy from Cape Canaveral on a mission that will take it closer to the Sun than any spacecraft in history.

  • Wakened from its latest hibernation, New Horizons may visit additional Kuiper Belt Objects

    Laurel KornfeldSeptember 16th, 2017

    Newly awakened from a five-month hibernation, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft may visit a third Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) after flying by 2014 MU69 on Jan. 1, 2019. Mission scientists at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL) received confirmation from NASA's Deep Space Network in Madrid, Spain, that the probe exited hibernation mode on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017.

  • Parker Solar Probe details revealed

    Paul KnightlyJune 1st, 2017

    NASA announced on May 31, 2017, a groundbreaking new mission to explore the Sun at close range. The Parker Solar Probe will launch in 2018 and will spend nearly seven years spiraling in toward the Sun, utilizing Venus for seven gravitational assists before making its closest approach of about 3.7 million miles (6 million kilometers) from the Sun's surface.

  • Solar Probe Plus gets green light to proceed

    Curt GodwinAugust 4th, 2016

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus has passed an important design review milestone and can now proceed to assembly and integration in preparation for its scheduled summer 2018 launch date. Currently comprising only a primary structure and propulsion system, the assembly can now move forward with the installation of the remainder of the spacecraft's systems and science instruments.