Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: International Space Station

  • Gallery: Soyuz MS-04 crew back on Earth

    Derek RichardsonSeptember 3rd, 2017

    Blazing through Earth's atmosphere and coming to a parachute assisted touchdown in Kazakhstan, three International Space Station crew members returned home in their Soyuz MS-04 capsule. The landing took place at 9:21 p.m. EDT Sept. 2 (7:21 a.m. local time / 01:21 GMT Sept. 3), 2017.

  • Space station trio returns to Earth in Soyuz MS-04

    Derek RichardsonSeptember 3rd, 2017

    Three members of Expedition 52 returned to Earth inside their Soyuz MS-04 spacecraft. The landing took at 9:21 p.m. EDT Sept. 2 (7:21 a.m. Kazakh Time / 01:21 GMT Sept. 3), 2017, in Kazakhstan.

  • Johnson Space Center closed through Labor Day to evaluate safety after Harvey

    Derek RichardsonAugust 30th, 2017

    Hurricane Harvey, now a tropical storm, has prompted NASA to cancel an in-flight question and answer session with Expedition 52 astronaut Peggy Whitson, who is currently aboard the International Space Station. Additionally, the Johnson Space Center will remained closed until Sept. 5, 2017, to all but mission mission-essential personnel while officials evaluate the safety of the center.

  • Astronauts showcase space art created with childhood cancer patients

    Press ReleaseAugust 20th, 2017

    Patients from around the world will have the opportunity to see a spacesuit art project they helped create. Astronauts currently living and working on the International Space Station will unveil the project at 10:25 a.m. EDT (14:25 GMT) Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017. The 20-minute Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

  • Spacewalk goes into overtime as cosmonauts deploy satellites, collect science

    Derek RichardsonAugust 18th, 2017

    The two cosmonauts on board the International Space Station donned spacesuits and stepped outside the outpost for the 43rd Russian segment-based extravehicular activity (EVA). The Aug. 17, 2017, spacewalk lasted more than an hour longer than planned for a total duration of 7 hours, 34 minutes.

  • SpaceX’s CRS-12 Dragon capsule arrives at space station

    Derek RichardsonAugust 16th, 2017

    Some 36 hours after leaving Kennedy Space Center atop a Falcon 9 rocket, SpaceX's CRS-12 Dragon capsule rendezvoused with and was berthed to the International Space Station. The cargo spacecraft is carrying more than 6,400 pounds (2,900 kilograms) of supplies and science experiments.

  • Gallery: SpaceX launches CRS-12 into space, lands Falcon 9 first stage

    Derek RichardsonAugust 16th, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Aug. 14, 2017, SpaceX sent its last new first-generation Dragon capsule into space atop a Falcon 9 rocket. The CRS-12 mission carried more than 6,400 pounds (2,900 kilograms) of equipment and supplies to the International Space Station.

  • SpaceX’s CRS-12 mission sends experiments, crew supplies to space station

    Bart LeahyAugust 14th, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — Without so much as a flinch, SpaceX sent the CRS-12 Dragon cargo spacecraft off to the International Space Station. Liftoff took place at 12:31 p.m. EDT (16:31 GMT) Aug. 14, 2017, within its one-second "instantaneous" launch window. This flight is poised to deliver more than 6,400 pounds (2,900 kilograms) of equipment and supplies to the orbiting outpost in the next 36 hours.

  • Live Coverage: Launch of NASA’s CRS-12 on SpaceX Falcon 9

    Jason RhianAugust 14th, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — NASA and SpaceX are preparing to launch the 12th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station atop one of the company's "Full Thrust" Falcon 9 rockets. Liftoff is currently scheduled for 12:31 p.m. EDT (16:31 GMT) from historic Launch Complex 39A. Tune in here for SpaceX's Live Webcast.

  • Science and technology to get boost from CRS-12 mission

    Jim SiegelAugust 12th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The cargo aboard NASA’s scheduled Aug. 14, 2017, CRS mission to the ISS could help more people than just the six crew and cosmonauts currently living there. With more than three tons of experiments and materials being ferried, SpaceX's Dragon capsule could benefit people ranging from those suffering from Parkinson's disease, to those seeking bio-engineered organs, to soldiers on the battlefield.

  • SpaceX launching last new first-generation Dragon cargo ship

    Lloyd CampbellAugust 4th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX is set to send its next supply mission to the International Space Station (ISS) as early as Aug. 13, 2017. That mission, CRS-12, will mark the end of an era as it will be the last new first-generation Dragon spacecraft to fly.

  • ISS crew size increases to 6 with Soyuz MS-05 docking

    Derek RichardsonJuly 28th, 2017

    After a six-hour, four-orbit trek to rendezvous and dock with the International Space Station (ISS), the three-man crew of the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft joined Expedition 52, increasing the outpost’s population to six people.

  • Soyuz MS-05 successfully launches three-man crew to the ISS

    Lloyd CampbellJuly 28th, 2017

    The Soyuz MS-05 crew is on its way to the International Space Station (ISS) following a flawless launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Liftoff occurred at 11:41 a.m. EDT (9:41 p.m. local time / 15:41 GMT) on Friday, July 28, 2017, utilizing the Soyuz-FG rocket. This was the 134th flight of a crewed Soyuz vehicle.

  • NanoRacks airlock moving toward 2019 installation on the ISS

    Jim SiegelJuly 21st, 2017

    Five months ago, NanoRacks LLC announced it would partner with Boeing to build the first private airlock for the International Space Station. That initiative is progressing and recently achieved a design milestone with the successful test of a NASA-built, full-scale mockup at the Johnson Space Center in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL).

  • Sierra Nevada ground tests Dream Chaser’s steering, brakes

    Bart LeahyJuly 18th, 2017

    On Monday, July 17, SNC put its full-scale Dream Chaser test vehicle through its paces on the ground at NASA’s Armstrong Research Center in California. According to a report by Spaceflight Now, the ground tests towed the vehicle fast enough to evaluate the performance of its brakes, steering, guidance, navigation, and control systems.