Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Tagged: EM-1

  • NASA Exploration Mission-1 managing current challenges, but launch could slip to 2020

    Bart LeahyNovember 9th, 2017

    On November 8, 2017, NASA released an update following a schedule review of Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), the first uncrewed flight test of the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft to the Moon.

  • Major core stage hardware completed for first SLS flight

    Heather SmithOctober 4th, 2017

    NASA has completed major work for all five parts of the core stage for the first flight of the massive Space Launch System (SLS). Additionally, manufacturing has been completed for all four core stage test articles with evaluation underway on the engine section structural test article at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  • Insider Exclusive: The people and parts of NASA’s EM-1 mission

    Jason RhianOctober 1st, 2017

    PROMONTORY, Utah — NASA is eyeing a 2019 launch for its new super-heavy-lift Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft. While some of the systems are so-called legacy hardware, they have never been flown in this configuration without a side-mounted shuttle and with a mandate to take crews far beyond low-Earth orbit. For each mission, NASA is not only relying on the parts to guarantee its astronauts travel safely to these distant destinations but also people who work every day to ensure these components are as reliable as possible.

  • NASA’s EM-1 Orion powers up for the first time

    Bart LeahyAugust 24th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA and Lockheed Martin powered up the computer systems of the Orion spacecraft for the first time last week at the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. The uncrewed spacecraft will fly atop the Space Launch System (SLS) on Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) in 2019.

  • Orion update: Lighting the fire of awareness – Part 1

    Jason RhianAugust 21st, 2017

    Officials with NASA sat down with SpaceFlight Insider to discuss the current status of the Orion program, which evolved into discussions on how the space agency is working to spread the word about the new crew-rated capsule as well as the ties that the program has with past efforts—and more.

  • SLS ‘racing stripes’ replaced with photogrammetry targets

    Heather SmithAugust 8th, 2017

    Dulles, Virginia-based Orbital ATK has cast ten solid rocket booster (SRB) segments for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). Four of those segments have been completed at the company's facilities in Promontory, Utah, and painted with photogrammetric markings. Two five-segment boosters will be used to help power the super-heavy-lift vehicle into orbit as early as 2019 – but what happened to the rocket's "racing stripes"?

  • 3 CubeSats win rides on 1st flight of NASA’s SLS

    Jim SharkeyJune 9th, 2017

    On Thursday, June 8, NASA announced the three winning teams of the semi-final round of the space agency's Cube Quest Challenge. In addition to winning $20,000 each in prize money, the three teams have also secured spots to launch their spacecraft on Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) – the first flight of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) with the Orion spacecraft.

  • NASA OIG: SLS unlikely to launch in 2018

    Jason RhianApril 15th, 2017

    NASA.s Office of Inspector General has issued an audit detailing how the agency's Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) will likely not launch in 2018. This might be a moot point as NASA is considering flying EM-1 with a crew, which would push the launch to 2019 anyway. These are some of the issues facing the first flight of the agency's new rocket.

  • Orion update: progress and setbacks in February 2017

    Mackenzie KaneMarch 13th, 2017

    NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Hensel Phelps Construction Co. successfully completed the modifications to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) in early February, making room for the new Space Launch System (SLS) rocket.

  • EM-1 could become Apollo 8 for the 21st century

    Derek RichardsonFebruary 24th, 2017

    NASA is taking a hard look at having crew fly on the first integrated mission of the agency's Space Launch System (SLS) super-heavy-lift rocket and Orion spacecraft. At present, NASA is only undertaking a feasibility study, reviewing what risks would be incurred, what needs to be added to allow for this happen, and what potential benefits could be had.

  • NASA studying the possibility of adding crew to EM-1

    Curt GodwinFebruary 16th, 2017

    On Feb. 15, 2017, Robert Lightfoot, NASA's acting administrator, announced that he was ordering a study on the feasibility of adding a crew to Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1). This would mark a significant change from the agency's current mission roadmap, which has EM-1 flying uncrewed in 2018, with crew ultimately launching several years later on EM-2.

  • Massive SLS test stand completed at Marshall

    David BrownJanuary 13th, 2017

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located in Huntsville, Alabama, recently marked the completion of major construction for Test Stand 4693, wrapping up work that began in May 2014. Engineers will now connect networks of cables, pipes, valves control systems, cameras, and other equipment needed to test the massive Space Launch System (SLS) hydrogen tank.

  • Orion Mission Update for September 2016

    Mackenzie KaneOctober 1st, 2016

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — As NASA’s Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) approaches, its science and technology are being tested and prepared across the country. EM-1 is set to launch the Orion capsule aboard the new Space Launch System (SLS) out past the Moon, crewless, for systems testing.

  • NASA discusses SLS and Orion progress at ‘Day of Mars’ event

    Curt GodwinAugust 22nd, 2016

    NEW ORLEANS — Before wowing onlookers with the sights and sounds related to testing an RS-25 engine, NASA sought to educate members of traditional and social media outlets about agency and industry efforts related to the Journey to Mars.

  • Orion service module completes critical design review

    Derek RichardsonJuly 3rd, 2016

    A joint critical design review (CDR) of the Orion service module was completed earlier this month by teams at both NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). The European-built module will provide power, propellant, and consumables for future crewed missions into deep space.