Spaceflight Insider

SpaceX Falcon 9 SpX-5 launch slips to NET Jan. 10

SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 Dragon Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 40 photo credit Michael Seeley SpaceFlight Insider

Photo Credit: Michael Seeley / SpaceFlight Insider

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla — The launch of a Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX ) Falcon 9 v1.1 with its payload of a Dragon spacecraft will have to wait a little longer before it takes to the skies. NASA released the new launch attempt via the NASA blog on SpaceX. This followed the scrubbed Jan. 6 launch attempt that was caused due to a actuator problem with the rocket’s second stage.

The NASA blog stated the following:

SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 rocket Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 40 CRS 5 photo credit Jason Rhian SpaceFlight Insider

Photo Credit: Jason Rhian / SpaceFlight Insider

SpaceX will make its next attempt to launch the Falcon 9 rocket from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida to send the unpiloted Dragon cargo ship to the International Space Station on Saturday, Jan. 10. Launch time is approximately 4:47 a.m. Eastern time. NASA TV coverage will begin at 3:30 a.m. Eastern time.

A launch on Saturday would result in Dragon arriving at the station for its grapple on Monday, Jan. 12 at approximately 6 a.m. Eastern time.

The backup launch opportunity would be on Tuesday, Jan. 13 with launch at approximately 3:36 a.m. Eastern time. That would result in a grapple of Dragon on Thursday, Jan. 15 at approximately 6 a.m. Eastern time.

The move of the launch date to Jan. 10 results in a Dragon departure from the station on Tuesday, Feb. 10.

If everything goes according to plan, the rockets flight could herald the start of a new era in space exploration. SpaceX is planning on having the Falcon 9 conduct a controlled descent on a barge that will be placed out in the Atlantic Ocean.

 

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Jason Rhian spent several years honing his skills with internships at NASA, the National Space Society and other organizations. He has provided content for outlets such as: Aviation Week & Space Technology, Space.com, The Mars Society and Universe Today.

Reader Comments

Better to be safe than sorry but can SpaceX fulfil its obligations to all of its customers this year?

14+ launches planned this year, from what I can tell. Pretty ambitious.

You incorrectly state the problem was with the actuator in the first stage. I believe SpaceX and other news sources indicated it was with the second stage. Like your website.

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