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Industry expert: Asteroid mining could begin within the next 10–20 years

Mining the near-limitless mineral wealth found in our solar system's asteroids is not only possible - it's could become a fact of life sooner than we think. Image Credit: James Vaughan / SpaceFlight Insider

Mining the near-limitless mineral wealth found in our Solar System’s asteroids is not only possible, it could become a fact of life sooner than we think. Image Credit: James Vaughan / SpaceFlight Insider

Mining the countless space rocks found in our Solar System for valuable resources could become a reality within two decades. This is according to J.L. Galache of Aten Engineering. However, he cautions that there are still many challenges that must first be overcome to make it happen that quickly.

Mining the near-limitless mineral wealth found in our solar system's asteroids is not only possible - it's could become a fact of life sooner than we think. Image Credit: James Vaughan / SpaceFlight Insider

One aspect of Aten Engineering’s operations is to expand humanity’s presence throughout the Solar System. Image Credit: James Vaughan / SpaceFlight Insider

Galache founded Aten Engineering, which provides technical solutions in the areas of detection, discovery, follow-up, and characterization of asteroids. The company’s ultimate goal is to pave the way for future human exploration of the Solar System by helping in in-space resource extraction and utilization.

Aten Engineering aims to be first in the development of ideas that could shape the future of asteroid mining. Galache is convinced that good concepts will fuel the success of this industry, attracting potential investors and making the exploitation of space resources a reality.

“The first step is always the hardest, but once it is taken and a concept is proven, investment will follow. That is why my partners and I have founded Aten Engineering now, because we want to be there when the industry takes off, with a ready product for the current and future asteroid mining companies,” Galache told Astrowatch.net.

Galache sees Aten Engineering as part of an ecosystem providing support services necessary for asteroid mining companies. Such a network of supporters could be crucial for the long-term development of this segment of commercial space market.

“Asteroid mining on a regular basis, such as terrestrial mining takes place today, with an established industry and an ecosystem of supporting services businesses for the mining companies, could start anywhere from 20 to 50 years is my personal opinion. But any industry must start somewhere, and I think we will see the first asteroid being mined 10 to 20 years from now, at which point the surrounding ecosystem will begin to grow,” Galache said.

J.L. Galache

J.L. Galache. Photo Credit: Aten Engineering

However, in order to successfully start asteroid mining, a few obstacles must first be overcome. One of these is insufficient knowledge about certain types of asteroids. Although our understanding of asteroids as a whole is advanced enough, gaining a better understanding of the nature of various types of near-Earth objects could be a critical factor in terms of success.

Galache underlined that mining techniques will have to be tailored to specific types of asteroids.

“For example, you will not send the same equipment to mine an iron-nickel asteroid as you would a carbonaceous asteroid, and you will not send the same equipment to mine a fine regolith-covered asteroid as a rubble pile. I do believe we have figured out what all the unknowns are and it is just a matter of finding answers and solutions to those unknowns,” he noted.

Therefore, mining companies will need to know what the best asteroids to mine are and where they are located. It will also be necessary to know as much as possible about the key characteristics of these objects.

“This is not information that is being provided by public entities, so Aten Engineering was set up as a private company to address this gap in the asteroid mining chain: Asteroid prospecting,” Galache concluded.

Galache is an asteroid astronomer currently serving as Chief Technology Officer of Aten Engineering and as an adviser to Deep Space Industries (DSI). He has designed and directed asteroid data projects with NASA’s Frontier Development Lab and Oracle. He was also Acting Deputy Director, and head of Strategy and Innovation at the International Astronomical Union’s Minor Planet Center.

 

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Tomasz Nowakowski is the owner of Astro Watch, one of the premier astronomy and science-related blogs on the internet. Nowakowski reached out to SpaceFlight Insider in an effort to have the two space-related websites collaborate. Nowakowski's generous offer was gratefully received with the two organizations now working to better relay important developments as they pertain to space exploration.

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