Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Missions

  • Two shuttle veterans poised to join U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame

    Florida TechJanuary 21st, 2018

    On Jan. 18, 2018 former shuttle astronauts Dr. Thomas D. Jones and Captain Scott D. Altman, were recognized for their contributions toward the field of space sciences - by being selected for induction into the United States Astronaut Hall of Fame. When they claim their medallions, they will become two of only 95 individuals to receive this honor. 

  • Electron soars to orbit on Rocket Lab’s “Still Testing” flight

    Rae Botsford EndJanuary 21st, 2018

    On Sunday, January 21, at 2:43 p.m. NZDT (01:43 GMT), Rocket Lab successfully completed the second test flight of the company's Electron rocket from their own Launch Complex 1 on the Māhia Peninsula in New Zealand.

  • Saturn’s moon Titan has ‘sea level’ like Earth

    Jim SharkeyJanuary 20th, 2018

    Researchers using data from NASA's Cassini mission have discovered a striking similarity between Earth and Saturn's moon Titan. Just as the surface of Earth's oceans lies at an average elevation referred to as "sea level", Titan's seas also lie at an average elevation. Titan is the only world in our solar system other than Earth known to have stable liquid on its surface. Instead of water, Titan'...

  • NASA planning 2 spacewalks to replace Canadarm2 ‘hand’ despite US government shutdown

    Bart LeahyJanuary 20th, 2018

    Despite budget battles in Washington, D.C. resulting in a temporary shutdown of the U.S. federal government, NASA and the International Space Station's Expedition 54 crew still plan to carry out a pair of spacewalks to replace one of the 16-year-old "hands" on the outpost's robotic arm.

  • Steep Martian slopes reveal structure of underground ice sheets

    Jim SharkeyJanuary 15th, 2018

    Scientists using NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have located eight sites where thick deposits of ice beneath the Martian surface are exposed in the faces of steep eroding slopes known as scarps. The eight scarps, have slopes as steep as 55 degrees, provide researchers with new information about the internal structure of previously-discovered layered subsurface ice sheets in Mars's middle...

  • NASA video simulation takes viewers on a journey through the Orion Nebula

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 14th, 2018

    A new 3D video simulation that uses images taken by both the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes takes viewers on a stunning simulated journey within the Orion Nebula.

  • SpaceX’s CRS-13 Dragon capsule departs ISS after 4-week stay

    Derek RichardsonJanuary 13th, 2018

    The first visiting vehicle activity at the International Space Station in 2018 concluded Jan. 13 with the unberthing, departure and splashdown of SpaceX’s CRS-13 Dragon cargo ship after spending nearly a month at the orbiting outpost.

  • Delta IV launch of NROL-47 to be ULA’s first of 2018

    Jim SharkeyJanuary 8th, 2018

    United launch Alliance’s (ULA) first flight of 2018 is currently scheduled for Wednesday, January 10. A Delta IV Medium+(5,2) rocket is set to carry the  classified NROL-47 payload from Vandenberg Air Force Base’s Space Launch Complex 6 at 1 p.m. PST (4 p.m. EST). The mission will be ULA’s 27th flight for the National Reconnaissance Office […]

  • New Horizons mission invites public to celebrate New Year’s KBO flyby

    Laurel KornfeldJanuary 5th, 2018

    The world may have celebrated New Year's 2018 just days ago, but NASA's New Horizons mission is already inviting the public to welcome 2019 with a visit to Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69.

  • 2 external instruments installed on ISS over New Year’s holiday

    Derek RichardsonJanuary 3rd, 2018

    While many around the world celebrated the arrival of 2018 with champagne, fireworks and social gatherings, robotics operators at NASA’s Johnson Space Center rang in the New Year by working to remotely install new external instruments recently brought to International Space Station inside the trunk of SpaceX’s CRS-13 Dragon cargo spacecraft.

  • Progress MS-06 freighter undocks from ISS

    Derek RichardsonDecember 28th, 2017

    Closing out visiting vehicle comings-and-goings for 2017, the unpiloted Russian Progress MS-06 cargo spacecraft undocked from the International Space Station in preparation for an eventual deorbit into Earth’s atmosphere.

  • Gallium nitride processor: Next-generation technology for space exploration

    Tomasz NowakowskiDecember 28th, 2017

    A material known as gallium nitride (GaN), poised to become the next semiconductor for power electronics, could also be essential for various space applications. Yuji Zhao, an expert in electrical and computer engineering at Arizona State University (ASU), plans to develop the first ever processor from gallium nitride, which could revolutionize future space exploration missions.

  • Planetary Resources’ Arkyd-6 ready for launch

    Collin SkocikDecember 27th, 2017

    After years of development, the Planetary Resources-built Arkyd-6 is finally on the last leg of its journey into space. It is scheduled to be launched as a secondary payload atop India’s PSLV-C40 mission in January 2018.

  • New Horizons put in final hibernation before 2019 KBO flyby

    Laurel KornfeldDecember 24th, 2017

    A little over a year before its New Year's day 2019 flyby of Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft was put into its final hibernation prior to the visit.

  • 3-person Soyuz MS-07 docks with ISS

    Derek RichardsonDecember 19th, 2017

    The population of the International Space Station returned to six people when Soyuz MS-07 with three fresh crew members autonomously docked with the outpost's Rassvet module. Contact between the two vehicles occurred at 3:39 a.m. EST (08:39 GMT) Dec. 19, 2017.