Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Editorial

  • Chasing New Horizons: An epic exploration to a strange new world

    Laurel KornfeldMay 9th, 2018

    Close to three years after the historic New Horizons Pluto flyby wowed the world, mission principal investigator Alan Stern and astrobiologist and mission science team member David Grinspoon tell the riveting story of a monumental exploration 26 years in the making in their new book Chasing New Horizons: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto.

  • Opinion: Mutants, airstrikes and more: Space ‘fake news’ on the rise

    Jason RhianApril 1st, 2018

    Fake news, a relatively new term that has entered the public lexicon. Stories regarding space flight have recently seen an uptick in incorrect information being reported and given the complexity of the subject matter, it might be understandable—but it is also preventable.

  • Pixels and privatization: An artist’s view of NewSpace

    Jason RhianMarch 11th, 2018

    They produce the imagery that inspires the masses to turn their gazes skyward, but what do artists actually think with regards to where space exploration is and where it is going? To find out, SpaceFlight Insider spoke with James Vaughan, a digital artist in the age of the privatization of space.

  • What are some of the obstacles to NASA’s efforts to find life on Mars?

    Press ReleaseMarch 1st, 2018

    The possibility of life on Mars has grabbed the imagination for centuries, inspiring books, films, records, and Earthbound dreamers to gaze into the sky and wonder what could really be out there. NASA is now looking at ways to see of Mars was ever habitable and if it contains life today. The agency is working to overcome an array of hurdles to achieve this long-held dream.

  • OPINION: Ending ISS too soon would be an Apollo-sized mistake

    Derek RichardsonFebruary 4th, 2018

    It appears the Trump administration may look to end support for the International Space Station by 2025. This proposal, if approved by Congress, would be a huge mistake similar to that of ending the Apollo program in 1972.

  • OPINION: How NASA became a ping-pong ball

    Jason RhianDecember 17th, 2017

    For 30 years, NASA's human space flight program was in a secure, albeit uninspiring, trajectory – low-Earth orbit. The loss of the Shuttle Columbia and her seven-member crew on Feb. 1, 2003, changed all that. The Shuttle era was set to end and the agency would discover there's something even more dangerous than re-entering Earth's atmosphere with damaged heat tiles – politicians.

  • Review: Bringing Columbia Home

    Jason RhianNovember 26th, 2017

    It was one of NASA’s most tragic moments and Bringing Columbia Home, a new book drafted by noted author Jonathan Ward and the agency’s last Space Shuttle Launch Director, Michael Leinbach provide a review of STS-107, Shuttle Columbia’s final flight. An interview with the authors reminds us of just what was lost – and why it is important to remember the accident which placed NASA on the tra...

  • Review: Weir focuses on the Moon with ‘Artemis’

    Jason RhianNovember 14th, 2017

    Over the course of the past year, public and private officials have altered their focus from Mars to a much closer target – Earth's Moon. Now, Andy Weir whose breakout success was based on the adventures of a castaway on the Red Planet has followed suit with his latest offering – Artemis.

  • Insider Exclusive: The people and parts of NASA’s EM-1 mission

    Jason RhianOctober 1st, 2017

    PROMONTORY, Utah — NASA is eyeing a 2019 launch for its new super-heavy-lift Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft. While some of the systems are so-called legacy hardware, they have never been flown in this configuration without a side-mounted shuttle and with a mandate to take crews far beyond low-Earth orbit. For each mission, NASA is not only relying on the parts to guarantee...

  • History in layers: The work of Simon Kregar Jr.

    Jason RhianSeptember 24th, 2017

    While photographs are great for accurately capturing historical elements, sometimes they are out of focus or miss something that is just out of frame. Enter the artist. When a trained artist takes a hold of the same event we get something... special. We get less technical and more of how that moment felt, what its significance was. One artist, in particular, Simon Kregar Jr., has made it his life'...

  • Review: The Sky Below: A True Story of Summits, Space, and Speed

    Jason RhianAugust 6th, 2017

    Those suffering from an inferiority complex probably shouldn't read the new book "The Sky Below". An in-depth review of the many adventures of former NASA shuttle astronaut Scott Parazynski, it covers his many accomplishments and at the same time keeping a very conversational tone. For those interested in the background of some of America's more recent space flyers, it has much to offer.

  • Insider Fact Check: Is NASA hiring someone to protect Earth from aliens?

    Jason RhianAugust 2nd, 2017

    It never fails: Let the news cycle get a little slow and someone decides to get creative with the facts. Such was the case on Wednesday, Aug. 1, when supposedly credible and professional sites such as USA Today and Newsweek dropped the ball and resorted to good ole fashioned clickbait-ing. It was a sign of the times that highlighted the current state of journalism in the U.S.

  • OPINION: Is there inconsistency in how NASA treats its private partners?

    Jason RhianJuly 23rd, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A recent report noted that NASA will not be releasing a public report on the findings of the SpaceX Falcon 9 CRS-7 explosion. The report also denotes that a previous similar accident was handled differently by NASA, but were the two accidents so distinct as to warrant two totally dissimilar approaches?

  • SpaceFlight Insider has joined Patreon!

    SpaceFlight InsiderJune 27th, 2017

    SpaceFlight Insider is proud to announce it has joined Patreon, a crowdfunding website that is a simple way for our loyal audience to contribute every month to our coverage of the space industry and get exclusive rewards in return!

  • OPINION: Radiation hucksters strike again

    Robert ZubrinJune 16th, 2017

    Dr. Robert Zubrin states his opinion on recent claims by a professor that the cancer risk from cosmic-ray radiation on a mission to Mars is greater than expected.