Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Author: Lloyd Campbell

Lloyd Campbell’s first interest in space began when he was a very young boy in the 1960s with NASA’s Gemini and Apollo programs. That passion continued in the early 1970s with our continued exploration of our Moon, and was renewed by the Shuttle Program. Having attended the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on its final two missions, STS-131, and STS-133, he began to do more social networking on space and that developed into writing more in-depth articles. Since then he’s attended the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover, the agency’s new crew-rated Orion spacecraft on Exploration Flight Test 1, and multiple other uncrewed launches. In addition to writing, Lloyd has also been doing more photography of launches and aviation. He enjoys all aspects of space exploration, both human, and robotic, but his primary passions lie with human exploration and the vehicles, rockets, and other technologies that allow humanity to explore space.

Articles By Lloyd Campbell

  • Trump Administration proposes 2018 NASA budget

    March 17th, 2017

    The recent release of the Trump administration’s 2018 budget blueprint reveals that many of the items he said he would cut for NASA are actually being cut in favor of continuing other NASA priorities. The overall cut to the NASA budget is less than 1 percent of the 2017 budget which is good news for the space agency. The total NASA budget as proposed is $19.1 billion.

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: Apollo 11’s Columbia CM preparing for 4 city tour

    March 15th, 2017

    The Apollo 11 Command Module, Columbia, is currently being prepared for its first trip in more than 40 years. Having completed its first major trip, a journey to the Moon in 1969, the spacecraft toured the country before being turned over to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in 1971.

  • NASA conducts successful Orion parachute test

    March 14th, 2017

    NASA conducted another Orion parachute test on Wednesday, March 8, 2017, and the test vehicle performed perfectly. A C-17 aircraft lifted the Orion engineering model equipped with instrumentation to document the test, to a height of 25,000 feet (7,620 meters) before releasing it for its controlled descent.

  • DigitalGlobe Acquired by MDA

    March 4th, 2017

    DigitalGlobe, a satellite imagery company based in Westminster, Colorado, and MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates (MDA) – a Canadian radar, telecommunications, and imagery corporation – will merge into one company later in 2017.

  • Boeing to build satellite to increase Asia Pacific connectivity

    February 23rd, 2017

    Boeing announced on Feb. 20, 2017, that it has contracted to build a satellite for two customers: SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation and Kacific Broadband Satellites. The new "702 satellite" will provide expanded coverage for mobile, telephone, data, and internet users across the Asia Pacific region.

  • Virgin Galactic continues to test LauncherOne engine

    February 21st, 2017

    Last week, Virgin Galactic continued to test the first stage engine of its air-launched LauncherOne. The NewtonThree (N3) engine recently completed a long-duration test at full thrust.

  • The evolution of U.S. spacesuits from Mercury to today

    February 3rd, 2017

    In order for humans to survive in the hostile environment of outer space, mankind has invented new technologies ranging from rockets that lift us into space, to vehicles capable of sustaining us in space, and the ultimate personal space 'vehicle' – the spacesuit.

  • Our Spaceflight Heritage: The legacy of STS-107

    February 1st, 2017

    On Jan. 16, 2003, when the Space Shuttle Columbia (flight STS-107) lifted off from Launch Complex 39A, her crew was finally embarking on the mission they had waited five years to launch.

  • Our SpaceFlight Heritage: Apollo 1, NASA’s first crewed disaster a half century later

    January 27th, 2017

    In November 1966, NASA would bring the highly successful Gemini program to a close when commander James Lovell and pilot Buzz Aldrin splashed down in the Pacific Ocean. The tenth flight of the Gemini program closed out the program on a high note and paved the way for NASA to move onto the Apollo program which would land men on the surface of the Moon.

  • Progress MS-04 failure investigation prompts 3rd stage engine swaps

    January 22nd, 2017

    A Russian task force has determined the Dec. 1, 2016, Progress MS-04 failure was due to a fire in the oxidizer pump in the Soyuz carrier rocket's third stage engine, the RD-0110. This caused the pump to fail and break apart. As a result the third stage engines on the next two Soyuz rockets are being replaced.