Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Author: Laurel Kornfeld

Laurel Kornfeld is an amateur astronomer and freelance writer from Highland Park, NJ, who enjoys writing about astronomy and planetary science. She studied journalism at Douglass College, Rutgers University, and earned a Graduate Certificate of Science from Swinburne University’s Astronomy Online program. Her writings have been published online in The Atlantic, Astronomy magazine’s guest blog section, the UK Space Conference, the 2009 IAU General Assembly newspaper, The Space Reporter, and newsletters of various astronomy clubs. She is a member of the Cranford, NJ-based Amateur Astronomers, Inc. Especially interested in the outer solar system, Laurel gave a brief presentation at the 2008 Great Planet Debate held at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, MD.

Articles By Laurel Kornfeld

  • VIDEO: NEOWISE asteroid survey data released

    April 22nd, 2018

    Data collected over four years by NASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) has been publicly released by the mission team, accompanied by an animation that includes all asteroids and comets detected over the mission's duration.

  • IAU approves names for features on Charon

    April 18th, 2018

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has accepted a list of names for features on Pluto's largest moon, Charon, submitted by NASA's New Horizons mission team.

  • Latest Juno image shows Jupiter’s cloud tops in intricate detail

    April 10th, 2018

    Among the most recent JunoCam images released by NASA is an intricate, color-enhanced photo of Jupiter's cloud tops taken April 1, 2018, that has the appearance of a watercolor painting.

  • Interstellar ‘Oumuamua gives scientists new insights into formation of planetary systems

    April 5th, 2018

    Interstellar asteroid 'Oumuamua spent only a short time traveling through the Solar System, but its passage is providing scientists with new insights into the formation processes of planetary systems.

  • Scientists use Kepler telescope to study supernovae

    April 2nd, 2018

    NASA's Kepler space telescope was designed to discover exoplanets, but throughout its initial and extended missions, scientists have used its precision and ability to continuously collect data to study supernovae, the explosions produced by dying massive stars.

  • NASA delays launch of James Webb Space Telescope to 2020

    March 28th, 2018

    The highly anticipated launch of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has been delayed to May 2020 due to the need for extensive testing and integration of its parts, which the agency says it now recognizes will take longer than previously anticipated.

  • Dawn observations indicate Ceres is geologically active

    March 17th, 2018

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft, which has been orbiting Ceres for three years, has observed changes on the dwarf planet's surface indicating it is a dynamic, geologically active world. Two separate studies published in the journal Science Advances discuss these changes with one centering on the changing amounts of water ice and the other discussing the formation and distribution of carbonates.

  • New Horizons’ next target nicknamed Ultima Thule

    March 16th, 2018

    Following a public naming campaign that drew 115,000 participants, NASA's New Horizons team has selected the name Ultima Thule for the spacecraft's second target, Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) 2014 MU69, which the probe is scheduled to fly past on New Year's Day 2019.

  • NASA begins assembly, test, and launch operations for Mars 2020 rover

    March 15th, 2018

    NASA has started the assembly, test, and launch operations (ATLO) for its Mars 2020 rover, a key milestone that involves bringing together parts from all over the world.

  • Juno data reveals astonishing depth of Jupiter’s jet streams

    March 8th, 2018

    Jupiter's colorful belts and bands are connected to cylindrical jet streams that extend as far as 1,900 miles (3,000 km) through the giant planet's atmosphere, according to data returned by NASA's Juno orbiter.

  • Curiosity rover tests new drilling technique

    March 2nd, 2018

    NASA's Curiosity rover conducted its first drilling in over a year on Feb. 26, 2018, to test a new technique developed by mission team members on Earth after the motor powering the drill's feed mechanism malfunctioned in December 2016.

  • MRO image shows dust covering Phoenix landing site

    February 22nd, 2018

    An image of the 2008 Phoenix Mars landing site taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) nearly a decade after it touched down on the dusty plains of the Red Planet reveals dust has covered much of the site.

  • Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in precautionary standby mode

    February 18th, 2018

    NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) placed itself into a precautionary standby mode after experiencing a sudden low battery voltage on February 15. 

  • Opportunity rover has spent 5,000 Martian days on the Red Planet

    February 18th, 2018

    NASA's Opportunity rover, which landed on Mars on Jan. 25, 2004, on a 90-sol (one sol equals one Martian day) mission, just marked its 5,000th sol roving and studying the Red Planet.

  • New Horizons breaks Voyager 1’s record for most distant images from Earth

    February 10th, 2018

    NASA's New Horizons spacecraft broke yet another record by capturing the most distant images from Earth, photographing an open star cluster along with several dwarf planets, Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and centaurs with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI).