Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Author: Derek Richardson

Derek Richardson is a student studying mass media with an emphasis in contemporary journalism at Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas. He is currently the managing editor of the student run newspaper, the Washburn Review. He also writes a blog, called Orbital Velocity, about the space station. His passion for space ignited when he watched space shuttle Discovery leap to space on Oct. 29, 1998. He saw his first in-person launch on July 8, 2011 when the space shuttle launched for the final time. Today, this fervor has accelerated toward orbit and shows no signs of slowing down. After dabbling in math and engineering courses in college, he soon realized that his true calling was communicating to others about space exploration and spreading that passion.

Articles By Derek Richardson

  • ‘Social movement’ continues to delay Ariane 5 launch

    March 23rd, 2017

    Arianespace has delayed the flight of its Ariane 5 rocket for a third day in a row due to a “social movement” at the Guiana Space Centre. The company has not set a new launch date. The mission, dubbed VA236, is set to send two communications satellites to geostationary transfer orbit.

  • Trump signs NASA Transition Authorization act of 2017

    March 21st, 2017

    President Donald Trump signed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Transition Authorization act of 2017 into law on March 21, 2017. The bill is the first such act passed by Congress and subsequently signed by the president since 2010.

  • Flight-proven Falcon 9 with SES-10 scheduled for NET March 29

    March 21st, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX’s first launch using a recovered Falcon 9 first stage will now take place no earlier than March 29, 2017. The two-day postponement of the SES-10 mission was due to range availability.

  • CRS-10 Dragon unberthed, recovered in Pacific Ocean

    March 19th, 2017

    The 10th SpaceX Dragon spacecraft to visit the International Space Station (ISS) left the outpost on March 19, 2017, and fell back to Earth. The capsule was recovered off the coast of Baja California.

  • Japanese Information Gathering Satellite sent into orbit

    March 17th, 2017

    After a 24-hour delay, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) successfully launched its H-IIA rocket with the Information Gathering Satellite (IGS) Radar 5 reconnaissance spacecraft. The vehicle soared out of the Tanegashima Space Center at 9:20 p.m. EDT March 16 (01:20 GMT March 17), 2017.

  • Expendable Falcon 9 launches indispensable EchoStar 23

    March 16th, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — Lighting up the Florida night skies, an expendable SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket soared toward space with the EchoStar 23 satellite after lifting off from historic Launch Complex 39A. Liftoff took place at 2 a.m. EDT (06:00 GMT) March 16, 2017, some 25 minutes into a 2.5-hour long window.

  • Zero 2 Infinity launches its first rocket from high-altitude balloon

    March 14th, 2017

    Zero 2 Infinity, a small startup with an unconventional plan to send small satellites into orbit, has successfully performed its first rocket test flight – from beneath a high-altitude balloon.

  • JAXA’s H-IIA with IGS Radar 5 delayed by 1 day

    March 14th, 2017

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has delayed the launch of its H-IIA rocket with the Information Gathering Satellite (IGS) Radar 5 reconnaissance satellite by one day due to weather. Liftoff is now targeted for 9:20 p.m. EDT March 16 (01:20 GMT March 17), 2017.

  • Weather wins as SpaceX scrubs launch of Falcon 9 with EchoStar 23

    March 14th, 2017

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket remained firmly attached to the launch mount as the weather did not want to cooperate. Liftoff was targeted for the beginning of a 2.5-hour long launch window that opened at 1:34 a.m. EDT (05:34 GMT) March 14.

  • EchoStar 23 set for launch atop SpaceX Falcon 9 at KSC

    March 12th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX is set to launch its second Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A. Liftoff is targeted for the beginning of a 2.5-hour long window that opens at 1:34 a.m. EDT (05:34 GMT) March 14, 2017.

  • Atlas V technical issue delays OA-7 Cygnus flight to NET March 21

    March 10th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The launch of Orbital ATK’s S.S. John Glenn OA-7 Cygnus spacecraft has been postponed by two days to March 21, 2017, due to a technical issue discovered on the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V set to send the freighter toward the International Space Station (ISS).

  • Orbital ATK names next Cygnus after John Glenn

    March 10th, 2017

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Orbital ATK announced it has named the next Cygnus spacecraft to be sent to the International Space Station after former astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn, who died on Dec. 8, 2016, at the age of 95.

  • NASA authorization bill passes Congress

    March 8th, 2017

    The first NASA authorization act in more than six years has cleared Congress and is on its way to President Donald Trump’s desk for his signature. The NASA Transition Authorization Act of 2017 was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on March 7, 2017.

  • MAVEN avoids crashing into Mars’ moon Phobos

    March 3rd, 2017

    NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, spacecraft just avoided colliding with Phobos, one of Mars’ two moons. An avoidance maneuver was performed on Feb. 28, 2017, to safely alter the trajectory of the orbiter.

  • Atlas V sends classified NROL-79 payload to space

    March 1st, 2017

    A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket roared out of Vandenberg Air Force Base in California with a classified payload for the National Reconnaissance Office. The NROL-79 mission lifted off at 9:50 a.m. PST (12:50 p.m. EST / 17:50 GMT) March 1, 2017, from Space Launch Complex 3E.