Spaceflight Insider

News Archive / Author: Curt Godwin

Curt Godwin has been a fan of space exploration for as long as he can remember, keeping his eyes to the skies from an early age. Initially majoring in Nuclear Engineering, Curt later decided that computers would be a more interesting - and safer - career field. He's worked in education technology for more than 20 years, and has been published in industry and peer journals, and is a respected authority on wireless network engineering. Throughout this period of his life, he maintained his love for all things space and has written about his experiences at a variety of NASA events, both on his personal blog and as a freelance media representative.

Articles By Curt Godwin

  • NASA could see windfall if FY 2019 Appropriations bill passes

    May 17th, 2018

    New legislation could see NASA gain a substantial increase in the agency's budget. Should the bill pass the full House and Senate, and get signed into law, NASA's science and exploration programs stand to gain the most.

  • As SLS’s Block 1 design matures, its capabilities come into clearer focus

    May 10th, 2018

    The Block 1 version of NASA's Space Launch System - could make more than one flight and be used for some big missions on the agency's manifest.

  • It’s a bird… it’s a plane… it’s a payload fairing?

    May 3rd, 2018

    SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has made it no secret that his goal is to reuse as much of a launch vehicle as possible in order to drastically reduce the cost of spaceflight. While the company has been recovering and reusing Falcon 9 first stages, recovering rocket's upstream components has been a more-challenging problem.

  • Block 1 SLS configuration may fly more than once

    April 30th, 2018

    During a hearing with the House Subcommittee on Space on March 7, 2018, NASA's then-acting administrator said that, should NASA have a second Mobile Launcher, the agency's Space Launch System may fly several times in the Block 1 form before the infrastructure is ready for the more-powerful Block 1B configuration.

  • NASA’s exploration goals come into focus with updated road map

    April 20th, 2018

    Four months after President Trump directed NASA to return to the Moon, the agency has presented a road map to meet the goals outlined in Space Policy Directive-1. The updated plan shifts focus from the previous "Journey to Mars" campaign back to the Moon, and—eventually—to the Red Planet.

  • ULA notches another successful mission with flight of USAF payloads on AFSPC-11

    April 14th, 2018

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Amidst scattered clouds, United Launch Alliance (ULA) notched its fourth successful flight of 2018. The April 14, 2018, AFSPC-11 mission was a classified one, however, carried out on behalf of the United States Air Force.

  • Turning it up to 11: Atlas V to launch pair of AFSPC-11 satellites for US Air Force

    April 13th, 2018

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Ground crews are making ready a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket to loft two primary U.S. Air Force payloads into geosynchronous orbit for the Air Force Space Command 11 (AFSPC-11) mission.

  • Reports: NewSpace firm launched four satellites – without permission

    March 22nd, 2018

    With NewSpace companies garnering headlines by completing previously unthinkable feats, one could be forgiven for thinking that these forward-focused startups could do little wrong. Recent events have shown this same "can do" attitude can be pushed too far.

  • NASA awards $96 million to American small businesses to foster research

    March 9th, 2018

    In an effort to enhance progress by small enterprises in space-related research and development, NASA recently awarded a total of $96 million to 128 American businesses. The funding, topping out at $750,000 per awardee, is part of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and is designed to support NASA programs while also benefiting the U.S. economy.

  • Mobile launcher gets Orion crew access arm, inches closer to completion

    March 3rd, 2018

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — Workers with NASA's Exploration Ground Systems at Kennedy Space Center recently passed another landmark in their effort to prepare the center's infrastructure for the maiden launch of the Space Launch System.

  • United Launch Alliance set to launch GOES S weather satellite

    February 28th, 2018

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Looking to join its GOES-16 sibling in providing enhanced weather coverage for the Western Hemisphere, workers at Space Launch Complex 41 (SLC-41) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) are in the final stages of readying the latest in Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite spacecraft for launch.

  • Lucky 113: NASA tests RS-25 engine at highest-ever power level

    February 23rd, 2018

    Engineers at NASA's Stennis Space Center conducted a test of the Space Launch System's (SLS) RS-25 engine, pushing the design to the highest level ever recorded for the powerhouse previously used to send Space Shuttles into orbit. The Aerojet Rocketdyne-manufactured engine reached a peak output of 113 percent of rated power during the Feb. 21, 2018, firing at the coastal Mississippi site.

  • Fresh from successful Falcon Heavy launch, SpaceX prepares to fly Spain’s PAZ satellite

    February 16th, 2018

    Less than two weeks after the successful first launch of its Falcon Heavy rocket, SpaceX looks to continue its string of successful flights with the delivery of Spain's PAZ radar imaging satellite to a Sun-synchronous orbit. The satellite, the first of its kind for the European nation,  is set to lift off atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base's Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at 6:16 a.m. PST (14:16 GMT) on Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018.

  • Two halves of James Webb Space Telescope come together for testing in California

    February 6th, 2018

    After years of development, and having undertaken rounds of discrete testing, the two major components of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) have arrived in California for fully-integrated testing. The flagship mission is referred to as the scientific successor to the stalwart Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and is set to launch on an Arianespace Ariane 5 rocket in the Spring of 2019 from Kourou, French Guiana.

  • NASA to study weather in boundary layer between Earth and space

    January 14th, 2018

    While most people tune-in to their local weather forecasts, and there are those who keep their eyes to the sky for the latest in space weather, the region in which they interact has been largely uncharted. NASA - with the help of two satellites planned for launch in 2018 - hopes to change that.